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Complete Course Descriptions 2013-2014

You can also download a version of our Course Descriptions in PDF format.

The College reserves the right to limit the number of students registered in any course, to cancel courses for which there is insufficient enrollment, or to make changes in prerequisites, course descriptions, credit allocations, and such schedule and section offerings in the academic year as may be necessary for the proper and efficient functioning of the College.

  • “Prerequisite” denotes required coursework that must be completed before beginning a course.
  • “Co-requisite” or “concurrent enrollment” denotes required coursework that may be taken concurrently with a course.
  • “Recommended background” denotes suggested or supportive education/training.

 

Detailed course descriptions are provided for the following:

 

American Sign Language

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ASL 101     American Sign Language I     (3)

This course introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language and is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of American Sign Language. Students will learn the basics of American Sign Language, including: finger spelling, signs, grammar, syntax, sentence structure, and basic communication skills. In addition, students will explore various facets of deaf culture.

ASL 102     American Sign Language II     (3)

Prerequisite: ASL 101. This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I and is designed for students who want to further develop their receptive and expressive finger spelling and signing skills. The course builds on the basics of American Sign Language I, including: finger spelling, signs, grammar, syntax, sentence structure, and basic communication skills. In addition, students will continue to explore various facets of deaf culture.

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Anthropology

ANTH 101     Introductory Anthropology     (3)

Provides the student with a broad overview of the discipline of Anthropology. The introduction presents the student with a history of the discipline. The course focuses on the basic subfields of Anthropology: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology, Linguistics, and Ethnology, the goal of which is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of humanity. Primatology creates understanding of the physical and social similarities shared by man and his closely-related kin in the animal kingdom. Human evolution is studied with the goal of understanding the processes of both physical evolution and paleoanthropological research. The course then focuses on the development of culture, from simple hunters to advanced civilizations. Case studies are drawn from different regions to emphasize multicultural approached to resolving common human problems. Every academic year.

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Art

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ART 101     Art History: Ancient to Gothic     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: ENGL 101. Provides a background in visual arts from the prehistoric period to the Gothic era. Studies the artistic achievements of each era in the context of important historical and philosophical developments. Emphasis on Egypt, Greece, Rome, medieval Europe, and Asia. Slides, lectures, and films. Three class hours weekly.

ART 102     Art History: Renaissance to Modern     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: ENGL 101. Provides background in the visual arts from the Renaissance to the Modern Era. Studies the artistic achievements of each era in the context of important historical and philosophical developments. Emphasis on Europe, England, the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Slides, lectures, and films. Three class hours weekly

ART 103     Essentials of Art     (3)

Introduces the use of rudimentary art techniques employed by artists, and preschool and elementary school teachers. Focuses on basic design, color theory and elements of composition as well as the application of various drawing and painting techniques. Directs students' interests and talents toward an individual form of self-expression. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 104     Painting Studio I     (3)

For students with basic media and composition background, covers the fundamentals of watercolor and acrylic painting, color theory and color mixing, working from models, landscape and personal experience. The art of the past is discussed, assessed, and often utilized while encouraging new approaches to expression. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 105     Painting Studio II     (3)

An intermediate painting course in a studio setting in which each student explores one or more of the painting media (watercolor, acrylics, pastel). Stress is on individual expression/creativity through exploration. The basic concern of painting, composition, color theory and subject matter will be discussed, thus affording the student the opportunity to develop his/her own educational "style". Two lecture-demonstration hours/two studio hours weekly. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ART 106     Expressive Drawing I     (3)

Presents a range of perceptual, conceptual, stylistic and technical skills. Students become familiar with many different methods of observation and presentation. Still life, landscape and conceptual methods are studied. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 107     Expressive Drawing II     (3)

This course will be a continuation of techniques and media introduced in Art 106 (Expressive Drawing I). Traditional and nontraditional subject matter will be explored with emphasis on the development of the student's own educational style. Two lecture-demonstration/two studio hours weekly.

ART 112     Two-Dimensional Design     (3)

Explores the fundamentals of pictorial organization through a series of visual problems. Students use the elements of art (line, shape, color, texture, value) within principles of design to communicate concepts visually. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need

ART 113     Three-Dimensional Design     (3)

Fundamentals of organizing three-dimensional space. Students learn to design space using line, plane, and mass. Traditional approaches (additive and subtractive techniques) as well as contemporary modes of expression. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 131     Introduction to Ceramics     (3)

Introduces basic ceramic concepts, hand and wheel techniques, surface decoration and glazes. Develops appreciation for ceramics past and present, and awareness of three-dimensional design. Two class hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 139     Art of Diverse Cultures     (3)

Focuses on contemporary art by the diverse population of American artists. Emphasis on artists of African, Native American, Asian, and Hispanic origin. Explores the subject using slides, lecture, discussion, and films. Three class hours weekly.

ART 140     Issues in Art on Location in New York     (3)

An intensive on-site museum and gallery course in New York City. Students view old master works, contemporary art and new genres. Lecture visits may include major museums and galleries, as well as neighborhood art scenes, studios and open-air settings. Three class hours weekly.

ART 160     Life Drawing     (3)

Drawings concentrate on the human form. Students develop an awareness of anatomical correctness and individual expression is encouraged. Utilizes a variety of drawing media. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 165     Issues in Art on Location — Art and Design in London     (3)

Intensive on-site museum and gallery course. Students view old master works and contemporary art. This museum study course focuses on the artist as a member of society-the artist who creates art and designs for community or individual use.

ART 215     Computer Graphics / Illustrator     (3)

Studio course introduces the basic techniques of digital painting and digital imaging. Students will create original imagery using Adobe Illustrator, input imagery created in another medium, and manipulate photographic imagery. Students will create and manipulate images based on formal design principles and conceptual frameworks. Two lecture/-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 231     Ceramic Sculpture     (3)

Introduces students to sculptural possibilities of clay. Students build large-scale pieced or modular works using hand and wheel techniques. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 250     Introduction to Photography and Darkroom Techniques     (3)

Introduces the basics of still photography. Students complete a number of assignments on the use of the 35mm camera system using a technical and aesthetic approach and learn photographic darkroom techniques producing finished prints for critique. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

ART 252     Photoshop     (3)

Lectures, demonstrations and hands-on activities will enable students to discover the basic theory and application of Adobe Photoshop. Students will complete a series of aesthetically inspired assignments pertaining to captured images, processing and manipulating digital images. Images created will be displayed using a computer monitor or outputted to a printer for critique. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

ART 253     Digital Photography     (3)

Students will acquire skills needed to fully operate and control a digital single lens reflex camera, digital image editing software and full color photographic printers. As in other art courses students will complete image assignments which will be critiqued in class. Two lecture-demonstration and two studio hours per week.

ART 255     Silk Screen Printing     (3)

Recommended background: ART 103 or 112 or equivalent. Introduces basic techniques of water-based silk screen printing; emphasis is on creating prints as fine art. Students learn to print multiples of their imagery and are encouraged to develop their own style and imagery using this medium. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

ART 260     Printmaking Workshop     (3)

Introduces the basic techniques of relief printing using linoleum, wood and experimental media. Students also learn basic book binding structures and incorporate their printed imagery in a sequential format. Two lecture-demonstration hours and two studio hours weekly.

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Behavioral Sciences

BEH 101     Language and Literacy Development in Young Children     (3)

Recommended background: ECH 110. Surveys development of language and literacy from birth to eight years. Foundations of learning theories; research and philosophies that shape current practice; and models that support emerging readers and writers. Further emphasis on integration of literacy throughout the curriculum, assessment techniques, literacy and diversity, selecting children's literature, working with families. Every academic year.

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Biology

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

BIOL 100     Human Biology     (4)

Non-sequential course for non-science majors. Balanced introduction to human anatomy and physiology, cancer, genetics and inheritance, development and aging, evolution, ecosystems and populations, human impact on biodiversity and the environment. Three class hours and one two-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 101     Essentials of Biology     (3)

Introduces selected topics which may include cell structure and division, tissues, nutrition, digestion, internal transport, respiration, neural control and locomotion, reproduction, genetics, microorganisms and disease, and selected topics in plant biology. Two class hours and one two-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 103     Biological Principles I     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or high school biology. Deals with the fundamental concepts and principles of biology. Topics include cell structure and function, basic biochemistry and molecular biology, and a survey of the three domains with emphasis on the eukaryotes: protista, fungi, plantae, and animalia. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 104     Biological Principles II     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 103 or 105 or equivalent. Survey of kingdom animalia; animal structure and function including organization and homeostasis; circulatory, lymphatic, immunity, digestive, respiratory, excretory, nervous, musculoskeletal and endocrine systems; reproduction, development; the genetic basis of life. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 105     Botany     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or high school biology. Introduces the study of plants; emphasis on physiology, structure, aspects of reproduction, ecology, taxonomy, and economic importance of plants. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 106     Zoology     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or high school biology. Acquaintance and appreciation of animals and the nature of animal life; concerned with animal morphology, physiology, behavior, evolutionary relationships, development and evolutionary history. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 165     Tropical Marine Biology I     (3)

Taught on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies. Includes study of coral reef zonation, marine currents, and ecology of the coral reef, rocky shore, mangrove swamp, coral reef fish, and plankton. Includes snorkeling so students can observe and collect organisms for study. Approximately 50% of course time is spent in the field and 50% in lectures and wet labs. Offered upon indication of need

BIOL 203     Anatomy and Physiology I     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 100, 101, 103 or equivalent. Human cell, tissues, skeleton system, muscle physiology, nervous system, special and somatic senses. Three class hours and one two-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 204     Anatomy and Physiology II     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 203. Continuation of the study of human anatomy and physiology. Topics include circulatory, respiratory, urinary, endocrine, reproductive and digestive systems and water, electrolyte and pH balance. Three class hours and one two-hour lab weekly.

BIOL 206     Microbiology     (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or 103 or equivalent. Surveys the principles of microbiology emphasizing the relationship of microorganisms to human disease. Two class hours and one two-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BIOL 207     Human Genetics     (3)

Intended for non-science majors, this introductory course provides an introduction to the principles of human genetics. Topics covered include: cells; the structure, function, and regulation of DNA; the biological basis of genetics and inheritance; mutations; expression of genetic information; population genetics; genetic and reproductive technologies; and the social, ethical, and legal impacts of genetic technologies. Three class hours weekly. Prerequisites: high school biology or BIOL 100 or BIOL 101.

BIOL 208     Conservation of Natural Resources     (3)

For science majors and non-majors, course explores the human relationship with the natural environment by examining critical issues that affect the viability of natural resources, including their importance, distribution, and impacts from human use at local, national, and global levels. Topics include concepts of ecology, air, soil, water, energy, biodiversity, and population dynamics. Field trips are an important part of the laboratory experience. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly.

BIOL 209     Basic Nutrition     (3)

Appropriate for science majors and non-majors, also students pursuing a career in healthcare professions. Examines the fundamentals of nutrition, including nutrient composition of foods; physiological factors influencing nutritional needs; behavioral considerations related to food intake; nutrient digestion, assimilation, and storage; energy requirements; life cycle requirements; weight management; diet therapy; fad diets; manufactured food; methods used in dietary assessment and nutrition research. Three class hours weekly.

BIOL 211     Genetics     (4)

Prerequisites: BIOL 103-104. Intended for science majors, this course emphasizes the genetic principles that underlie the molecular basis of heredity. Topics include: the structure, function, and regulation of DNA, genes, and chromosomes; the biological and molecular basis of genetics and inheritance; mutations; gene expression and regulation; population genetics; genetic technologies. Three class hours weekly, three lab hours weekly.

BIOL 213     Current Issues in Biology     (3)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101, 103, or equivalent. Explores contemporary biological issues that are of social and economic importance. Issues selected vary from one semester to another. Oral reports, written reports, and classroom discussions are a part of the teaching format. Appropriate for non-science majors as well as science majors. Three class hours weekly.

BIOL 214     Cell and Molecular Biology     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 103 or 105. Covers the anatomy and physiology of the plant and animal cell at a level of detail appropriate for the 200 level of instruction. Three class hours and three lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BIOL 216     General Microbiology     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 100, 101, 103 or equivalent. Balanced introduction to basic microbiology (biochemistry, taxonomy, genetics, and cell biology), clinical microbiology (pathogenic bacteriology); and applied microbiology (food and industrial microbiology and ecological microbiology). Three class hours and three lab hours weekly.

BIOL 218     Emerging Infectious Diseases and Bioterrorism     (3)

For science majors or non-majors, this course explores the role of biological, ecological, political, and socioeconomic factors in emerging infectious diseases and bioterrorism. Topics explored include the biology of specific infectious diseases, the relationships between disease agents and vectors, issues related to vaccinations and other disease treatments, the impact of globalization on the spread of emerging infectious diseases, government agencies and disease prevention, food safety, the history and current status of bioterrorism, and societal impacts of emerging infectious diseases and bioterrorism. Three class hours weekly.

BIOL 221     Grade A Potable Water     (3)

Studies potable waters, watershed protection and management, water storage, transmission, distribution, methods of treatment, disinfection, chemical and biological analysis of water. Two class hours and one two-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BIOL 222     Waste Water Treatment     (3)

Covers the operation and maintenance of municipal and industrial waste water treatment plants. Includes discussion of primary, secondary and tertiary treatment; nutrient removal; biological-oxidation and activated sludge; microbiology of waste water; techniques of handling, sampling and analyzing. Two class hours and one two-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BIOL 223     General Ecology     (4)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101, 103 or equivalent. A study of the fundamental principles of the ecology of plants and animals. Topics will include components of the ecosystem; energy flow in ecosystems; ecology of populations; organization and dynamics of ecological communities with a focus on aquatic, wetland and terrestrial ecosystems. Prerequisite: biology course with laboratory. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

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Business

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

BUS 080     Fundamentals of Bookkeeping     (1)

Presents the accounting equation, emphasizing the process of analyzing and recording financial information using the double-entry bookkeeping system. Recording of basic transactions and adjustments for service and merchandising enterprises, and maintenance of accounts receivable and accounts payable records. Students currently enrolled in BUS 101 or who have received a grade in BUS 101 of C or higher may not earn credit for this course. Thirty lab hours per semester.

BUS 090     Small Business Accounting     (1)

Prerequisite: BUS 101. For accounting majors, instruction in small business accounting procedures in conjunction with current accounting principles and tax requirements. Presents variations of the basic system in BUS 101 applicable to a small retail and service business. Topics include maintenance of cash journals and subsidiary records, year-end conversion from cash to accrual accounting, preparation of payroll and sales tax reports as required of businesses operating in New York State. Fifteen class hours per semester.

BUS 100     Employment Strategies,Techniques and Tools     (1)

Introduces skills and resources to compare different types of careers. Covers the job search process from networking through following up leads. Focus on preparation of rŽsumŽs and job applications along with effective interviewing skills. Attitude, interpersonal skills and personal presentation also covered. Three class hours weekly for five weeks.

BUS 101     Principles of Accounting I     (4)

The first of a two-course introduction to accounting. Introduces financial accounting. Covers the accounting cycle, including worksheet and financial statement preparation; receivables and payables; merchandise inventory; fixed and intangible assets; accounting for cash and payroll; and system and control procedures, including bank reconciliations. Study is applied by means of an assigned accounting practice project. Three lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

BUS 102     Principles of Accounting II     (4)

Prerequisite: BUS 101. Second of a two-course introduction to accounting concluding basic elements of financial accounting and introducing managerial accounting. Includes partnership and corporate accounting, emphasizing corporate earnings, equity and investments; manufacturing inventories, job order costing; product costing and budgeting; standard costing and variances; preparation of statement of cash flows. Course study is applied by means of an assigned accounting practice project. Three lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

BUS 103     Principles of Business     (3)

Overview includes foundations of American business, forms of enterprise, organizing for business, fundamentals of management, the production of goods and services, human relations, union-management relations, marketing, accounting, finance, money and banking, securities and investments, government relations and business law. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 105     Business Mathematics     (3)

Focuses on basic math combinations and shortcuts; problems in buying and selling items, including markups, markdowns, percents and discounts; preparation of banking and payroll records; and computation of simple interest and note discounts. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 106     Consumer Mathematics     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 101 or 105. Reviews basic operations, installment buying, real estate, taxes and insurance, investments, financial statements, basic statistics, present value, annuities and sinking funds. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 119     Real Estate Salesperson     (5)

This course is designed as preparation for the Real Estate salesperson's examination in compliance with the program of New York State Division of Licenses. The New York State examination must be passed before a salesperson's license is issued. In addition, the program prepares participants for job opportunities in the real estate profession. Students will attend classes to ensure meeting the basic state requirement of 75 hours of class. Note: This course can be taken as an Audit, which means that is does not carry any college credit, however, students who are taking it for the purpose of sitting for the NYS Salesperson's Exam will still need to fulfill the attendance requirements as well as a passing score on the Final Exam. Five lecture hours weekly.

BUS 150     Business Communications     (3)

Foundation for developing communication skills. Students apply principles of effective business and personal business correspondence. Job application and oral presentation are highlighted; also covers essentials of grammar, punctuation, spelling, use of reference materials, vocabulary enrichment. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 160     Small Business Management     (3)

For students planning to own or manage a small business. Topics include the challenge of ownership and management, planning and organizing a new business, preparing a business plan, location and layout decisions, controlling the business, selecting and managing staff, marketing, accounting, financial and legal considerations. Preparing a comprehensive business plan is a course requirement. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 165     International Business: The British Experience     (3)

Study/travel course acquaints students with the scope and nature of international business. Walking tours, lectures, and discussions complement visits to prominent institutions such as the Port of London Authority, Lloyds of London, Bank of England, London Transport Museum, American Embassy, London Stock Exchange, Precious Metals Exchange, and Harrods. Contact with labor and trade (import/export) organizations as well as British and American government officials is also anticipated. Requirements include readings on relevant topics, tours, presentations by officials and a research paper. Intersession only.

BUS 200     Principles of Management     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Provides a firm foundation in the primary principles of management. Explores management theory as well as management functions and targets discussion of top and middle managers. Recognizing that the future manager must remain abreast of business trends, current issues are addressed. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 201     Intermediate Accounting I     (4)

Prerequisite: BUS 102. First segment of a two-course comprehensive study covers current financial accounting theories and practices promoted by the profession. Includes various financial statements, related schedules; current assets including cash, temporary investments, receivables; inventory valuation and cost procedures; plant and intangible assets; long-term investments, other assets. Students planning to transfer should contact their prospective institution regarding course transferability. BUS 201 accepted for CPA certification credit in New York State. Three lecture hours, two lab hours weekly.

BUS 202     Intermediate Accounting II     (4)

Prerequisite: BUS 201. Second of a two-course comprehensive study of financial accounting covers current and contingent liabilities; non-current liabilities; stockholders' equity; accounting for leases, pension costs, income taxes; earnings per share and adequate footnote disclosure; statement of cash flows. Students planning to transfer should contact their intended transfer institution regarding course transferability. BUS 202 is acceptable for CPA certification credit in New York State. Three lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

BUS 203     Advertising     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Planning, creation, use and place of advertising in today's society. The role of the advertising campaign includes extensive study of various media utilized. Creating copy and layout design is an integral part of this course. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 204     Marketing     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Concept of market strategy planning includes segmentation and forecasting of consumer and organizational markets. Marketing mix variables include product life cycles, packaging, branding, pricing objectives and strategies, physical distribution, retailing, wholesaling, advertising, public relations, sales promotion, personal selling; marketing environment, marketing research, management processes. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 205     Business Law I     (3)

Emphasis is on the nature and function of law: civil and common law, contracts, agency and employment, bailments and personal property. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 206     Human Resource Management     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Personnel management in business; recruitment, selection, testing, employee development; psychological impact of individual and group behavior, motivation, morale, communication; management and labor relations; remuneration and security. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 207     Business Law II     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 205 or permission of instructor. Continuation of Business Law I. Topics include negotiable instruments, sales, real property, estates, bankruptcy and business organizations. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 208     Retailing     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Familiarizes students with merchandising and operational situations. Focuses on skills required to solve problems and make sound management decisions in areas such as choosing an effective form of business organization, location and site selection, store layout, sales promotion, customer relations, merchandise handling and display, and customer service. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 209     Cost Accounting     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 102. Focused on the managerial aspects of cost accounting with emphasis on planning and control. Includes contemporary cost terminology, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost behavior patterns, responsibility accounting, absorption and variable costing, activity-based costing, job and process costing, budgeting, standard costing, variance analyses, accounting for joint products, by-products, spoilage, waste, defective units, and scrap. Students planning to transfer should contact their intended transfer institution regarding course credit transferability. Course is accepted for CPA certification credit in New York State. Three lecture hours weekly.

BUS 210     Principles of Merchandise Buying     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 208. Focuses on the role and responsibilities of merchandise buyers in various types of retail organizations. Covers retail customer analysis, what to buy, how much, from whom, and a careful study of the merchandise assortment. Also covers the computer as an aid to the buyer, buying from foreign markets and the buyer's role in advertising, promotion and sales. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 216     Salesmanship     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Covers the fundamentals of selling with emphasis on meeting the customer's need. Focuses on the selling process: company history and policies, product knowledge, prospecting, the preapproach, the approach, the sales presentation, the demonstration, handling objections and the close. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 217     Fraud Examination     (3)

Fraud examination studies the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence; how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved. The course includes such topics as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, payroll and expense reimbursement schemes, non-cash misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses. Three lecture hours weekly.

BUS 219     Real Estate Broker     (3)

Designed as preparation for the Real Estate Broker's examination in compliance with the New York State Division of Licenses. The New York State examination must be passed before a salesperson's license is issued. In addition, the program prepares participants for job opportunities in the real estate profession. Students will attend classes to ensure meeting the basic state requirement of 75 hours of class. Note: This course can be taken as an Audit, which means that it does not carry any college credit, however, students who are taking it for the purpose of sitting for the NYS Salesperson's Exam will still need to fulfill the attendance requirements as well as a passing score on the Final Exam. Five lecture hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BUS 220     Business Statistics     (3)

Covers the application of statistical procedure to business decision making. Considers the nature and assembling of statistical data, methods of presentation, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency, dispersion, time series, sampling techniques, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, index numbers, probability and forecasting. Recommended for business and computer information systems/data processing students only. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 221     Accounting Systems with Microcomputer Applications     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 102, 225. Comprehensive course in accounting systems with practical Windows applications. Includes creating spreadsheet applications for financial and managerial purposes, use of computerized general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, payroll, depreciation accounting systems. Two hours lecture, two lab hours weekly.

BUS 222     Federal Income Tax     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 101. Introduces federal taxation and presents basic tenets of the federal income tax system emphasizing the preparation of returns in accordance with current tax statutes. Topics include determining gross income, itemized and business deductions, capital gains and losses, tax credits, payroll taxes, partnership and corporate returns. Study includes an assigned practice project. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 225     Microcomputer Application Software     (3)

Recommended background: basic microcomputer skills such as using Windows menus and mouse, creating, saving, and printing files. Briefly covers microcomputer hardware, the Windows operating system and its file management capabilities. Provides coverage of the features and functions of application programs for word processing, electronic spreadsheets, database management, and presentation graphics. Lecture and hands-on assignments emphasize application to typical business problems. Curriculum is based on the core competencies required for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification. Two hours lecture, two hours lab weekly.

BUS 226     Advanced Microcomputer Applications Software     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 225. Includes the advanced features of word processing, spreadsheets, database management software, presentation graphics. Topics include workgroups, forms, master documents, list and data management, macros, one-to-many and many-to-many relationships, and applications with multilevel switchboards. Students complete hands-on projects using microcomputer lab equipment and software. Curriculum is based on the intermediate-to-advanced competencies for Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification. Two hours lecture, two hours lab weekly.

BUS 227     Corporate Finance     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 102. Focuses on the managerial theories and practices of corporate finance, emphasizing the making of financial decisions. Topics include the environment of finance, financial analysis and planning techniques, time value of money, capital budgeting, cost of capital, working capital management, and sources of short?term and long?term financing. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 229     Professional Merchandising     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 208. Training in the skills and techniques of visual merchandising; development of managerial values in the role of the professional retailer. Includes the role and types of display in retailing, design principles and elements, arrangements, props, fixtures, materials, observing and rating displays; also decision making, leadership and supervision communication, and team management. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 239     Selected Topics in Business     (3)

Required background: BUS 103 Principles of Business. Devoted to selected topics in the area of business which may include but not be limited to the following; current trends, concepts, and evolving issues in the business environment.

BUS 245     Supervisory Management     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Focuses on issues commonly confronting first-line managers. Topics studied include the role of supervisory management, problem solving and decision making, communication, group dynamics, motivational leadership, team building and total quality management, managing human relations and building relationships with superiors and peers. Three class hours weekly.

BUS 246     Non-Profit Accounting     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 101 & 102. Recommended: BUS 227. Designed to introduce students to the core concepts, principles and practices of Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting and financial reporting under the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). Emphasis will be focused on scope of the reporting entity, revenue/expense recognition, asset/liability valuation, budgeting, capital projects and reporting requirements. Study is applied by means of an assigned practice set.

BUS 248     Event Planning     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Designed to introduce students to event planning. The course will focus on the planning and management of corporate events, conferences, workshops, meetings and conventions. Specific topics will include location planning, budgeting, venue requirements/contracts, menu planning, event marketing, guest registration, and risk/issue management. Projects will involve the student volunteering in an authentic event planning experience.

BUS 249     Introduction to Tourism     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Designed to introduce students to the tourism industry, the course will focus on the marketing, management and economic impact of tourism. Specific topics will include an exploration of careers in tourism, tourism promotion, tourism service suppliers, destinations, economic, political, environmental and socio-cultural impacts of tourism. Projects will involve student involvement in the tourism industry.

BUS 250     Wine Business Management, Marketing, and Sales     (3)

This course is a comprehensive class covering essential elements needed to succeed in the wine business. Research and demographics of wine consumers will be studied, with an emphasis on looking toward the future. Topics of study include business strategy for the wine industry, the business of enology and viticulture, supply chain management and quality control, marketing and branding, distribution, sales, tourism, media and public relations, global marketing, exporting and importing, financial aspects, accounting and tax, human resources management, legalities, establishment of a tasting room, and environmental and social responsibility. The class is limited to students 21 years of age and older.

BUS 251     Income Tax Internship     (1)

This course provides students an opportunity to take what they have learned in Federal Income Tax (BUS 222) and apply that in a real-world setting. Students gain knowledge and experience through preparation of individual income tax returns. Students are required to complete eight (8) hours of training resulting in certification from the Internal Revenue Service. Students will complete 40 hours of field experience during the semester. This Income Tax Field Experience will be offered through the VITA/CA$H Program held on the Auburn Campus. Offered Spring semester only.

BUS 260     Introduction to Project Management     (3)

Recommended background BUS 103. Course is designed to introduce students to project management and to the struggles and challenges associated with projects. The course will focus on the hands-on problems of managing a project. It will broadly cover the operational and conceptual issues faced by project managers. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to develop, execute, and control a basic project plan capable of supporting business objectives linked to measures of success for a single project.

BUS 270     Foundations of e-Business     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 103. Foundation course in concepts, strategies, and techniques to build e-commerce applications for profitability and growth. Concepts include planning, designing, and evaluating web sites, launching an e-business, marketing the e-business, and addressing ethical and legal factors. In addition, methods for providing security and integrity of data traffic through encryption, firewalls, and other means is explored. Strategies include redefining business models, changing the corporate culture, reinventing business processes, and establishing reliable customer service, and key life cycle of e-commerce. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

BUS 275     Business Internship     (3)

Prerequisites: Sophomore status with at least 30 credit hours (12 of those hours within the sponsoring academic department), a GPA of 2.5 or higher and recommendation from a business faculty member. Course provides an opportunity for qualified students to connect classroom learning with practical work experience. Designed to help the student develop marketable skills and gain valuable contacts. Each student's internship process and completion includes learning objectives, job preparation instruction, a faculty/internship sponsor, and a site supervisor. Students will complete at least 100 hours of work experience during the semester and 20 classroom hours. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

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Center for Academic Success

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

CAS 101     Foundations of Tutoring: Principles and Practices     (1)

Introduction to principles and practices of peer tutoring, including theoretical background of learning theories and methodologies of one-on-one tutorials and small group cooperative learning. Philosophy, procedures and hands-on practice prepares students to be competent in the peer tutorial process.

CAS 102     CRLA Tutor Internship     (2)

Prerequisite: CAS 101. Permission required. This course is designed to provide an internship opportunity to an experienced CAS/CRLA Certified tutor within a discipline-related work experience (classroom/lab/office) working at the discretion of the faculty sponsor. The four core elements include: experiential learning, professional development, performance assessment, and reflection. The student must be on-site for a minimum of 3 hours per week in addition to a 1 hour weekly meeting with the Internship Advisor.

CAS 103     CRLA Tutor Internship II     (2)

Prerequisite: CAS 102. Permission required. Based upon the recommendation of the faculty sponsor and internship advisor, a student would have the opportunity to repeat the CAS 102 internship. These students would also serve as mentors to the students taking CAS 102.

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Chemistry

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

CHEM 101     Elements of General Chemistry I     (4)

Prerequisite: High school algebra or MATH 099 or higher. This is an introductory chemistry course suitable for pre-nursing students, students who have not taken high school chemistry, or students who need a review before taking General Chemistry I (CHEM 103). Topics include measurements, the metric system, unit conversions, atomic structure, bonding, periodic law, nomenclature, reactions, chemical calculations, states of matter, solutions, acids and bases, and a brief introduction to organic chemistry. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

CHEM 103     General Chemistry I     (4)

Prerequisite: high school chemistry and completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 104. Includes basic calculations, periodic trends of the elements, introduction to precipitation, acid-base and oxidation reduction reactions, ionic and covalent bonding, introduction to thermodynamics, and gas laws. Three class hours, one three-hour lab weekly. Offered Fall semester only.

CHEM 104     General Chemistry II     (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 103. Continuation of CHEM 103; includes the study of liquids, solids, phase changes, chemical kinetics, chemical and aqueous equilibria (acid-base, solubility), thermodynamics, electrochemistry, transition elements and coordination chemistry, and introduction to organic chemistry. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly. Offered Spring semester only.

CHEM 108     Forensic Science     (3)

Provides criminal justice students with a basic knowledge of forensic science as applied to criminal investigation and related police science fields. Focuses on applied forensic science, laboratory techniques and procedures. Two class hours and two lab hours weekly.

CHEM 123     Fuel Cell Systems     (3)

Prerequisite: CHEM 103 and MATH 104 or higher. Fuel cell technology gives rise to a range of types of systems with varying operating parameters and applications. This course describes the operating features of a fuel cell and the underlying chemical, thermodynamic, and physical factors that determine its performance, as the basis for an appreciation of the benefits of fuel cell systems and their operating characteristics compared with conventional technology.

CHEM 207     Organic Chemistry I     (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 103-104. Study of organic compounds: nomenclature, properties, preparations; reactions, mechanisms and preparation, purification and analysis of organic materials. Laboratory work emphasizes technique and involves development of important basic skills. Preparation, purification and analysis of organic materials are also studied. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

CHEM 208     Organic Chemistry II     (4)

Prerequisite: CHEM 207. Course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

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College Success

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

CAY 100     Foundations for College Success     (1)

Cayuga 100 is designed to increase students' success in college, and is designed for students who are not able to take CAY 101. This course will introduce a few of the key On Course principles: active learning, personal responsibility, self-motivation, self-awareness, and emotional intelligence. Through readings, journals, class activities, and group projects, students will use many proven strategies for creating academic, professional and personal success. One credit hour. Note: CAY 100 or 101 may be required based on academic preparation and placement test results.

CAY 101     Foundations for College Success     (3)

Cayuga 101 is designed to increase students' success in college. The purpose of the course is for students to be able to understand, evaluate, and plan to navigate critical aspects of college life at Cayuga Community College. This course will help students achieve success in college and in life by following the eight On Course principles: personal responsibility, self-motivation, self-management, interdependence, self-awareness, lifelong learning, emotional intelligence and belief in themselves. Additionally, this course will create opportunities for students to master effective study skills. Through readings, journals, class activities, group projects and a comprehensive final project, students will learn about college expectations, using many proven strategies for creating academic, professional and personal success. Three contact hours weekly. Note: CAY 100 or 101 may be required based on academic preparation and placement test results.

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Computer Science

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

C.S. 025     Electronic Spreadsheets     (1)

Introduces the capabilities of electronic spreadsheets. Students learn how to create, save, retrieve, and print spreadsheets, write formulas, use functions, format numeric data, create graphs from spreadsheet data, sort data, and modify the spreadsheet display. Three hours per week for five weeks.

C.S. 035     Computer Literacy     (1)

For students who wish to gain an understanding of computers and how they are used. Covers computer types, input/output devices, personal computer hardware and software including application software. Lab assignments are completed in the microcomputer lab. Course is closed to students who have completed C.S. 110. Five weeks/three class hours weekly.

C.S. 055     Introduction to Microsoft Word for Windows     (1)

Introductory hands-on class emphasizes practice in creating, editing and formatting a variety of documents. No previous computer experience is necessary but typing ability of at least 30 WPM is recommended. Meets for a total of 15 hours.

C.S. 056     Intermediate Microsoft Word for Windows     (1)

Topics covered include formatting (page size and orientation, headers and footers, column format, importing pictures), designing tables, merging files, templates, styles and style sheets, wizards, macros, and AutoText. Three class hours weekly for five weeks.

C.S. 070     Introduction to the Internet     (1)

For students with no internet experience, includes the nature of the internet, e-mail, chat, Telnet, FTP, Usenet, ListServers, World Wide Web, search engines, and basic HTML for a web page. Includes demonstration and hands-on experience. Three class hours for five weeks.

C.S. 080     Microcomputer Maintenance     (1)

Designed to provide familiarity with the basic hardware components of a computer system, specifically the motherboard, microprocessor, hard disk, RAM, and interface boards. Working in a laboratory setting, students complete hands-on exercises in testing, upgrading, and modifying computer components. Three class hours for five weeks.

C.S. 082     Help Desk Concepts / Software Concerns     (1)

Prerequisite: BUS 225 or MS Office applications experience. Overview of the knowledge, skills, and concepts of typical help or support desk functioning. Also introduces selected technical problems and solutions as well as discussions of technical communications.

C.S. 100     Keyboarding     (1)

For students who have had no previous typing instruction. Using the touch system, students learn the keyboard and numeric pad and apply this skill on a computer terminal. Meets for a total of 25 hours.

C.S. 103     Windows Operating Systems     (1)

An understanding of Windows capabilities and features. No prior computer experience is required. Fundamentals of using the interface, working on the desktop, working with disks, creating files with Windows programs, managing files and folders, modifying the desktop work environment, installing and uninstalling programs, performing file and Web searching, and using integrated Internet Explorer features. Class meets for a total of 15 hours.

C.S. 110     Exploring Computer Technology     (3)

Course for non-computer science majors builds computer competency and broadens perspective on the use of technology. Hands-on lab projects focus on purchasing computer systems and devices; using productivity software such as word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics and e-mail; file management; working in wired and wireless network environments; searching, evaluating, and citing web sources; editing digital photos; working with multimedia; and designing simple web pages.

C.S. 120     Foundations of Computer Science     (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of, math placement beyond, or concurrent enrollment, in MATH 102. Introduction to computer science, including data storage and manipulation, operating systems, networking, algorithm development, an overview of programming languages and concepts, and the concept of software engineering. This course is intended for students enrolled in a C.S., C.I.S., GIS, or engineering related program. Three class hours weekly.

C.S. 180     Principles of Data Communications     (3)

Introduces the concepts and components of a data communication system. Covers an overview of data communications, hardware and software associated with data communications, common carriers versus private communications services, and network concepts. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need

C.S. 200     Programming in Visual Basic     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 120 or MATH 104 or MATH 114 or equivalent programming experience. Focuses on programming in Visual Basic and introduces computer programming using the Microsoft Visual Basic language. In developing programming techniques, students will have an available tool for exploring many areas of problem-solving with a minimum background. Two one-hour lectures/one two-hour lab weekly.

C.S. 215     Systems Analysis and Design     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 225 or equivalent computer application experience. Covers methods involved in analyzing and designing information systems. Focuses on investigation analysis techniques; data flow diagrams; general and detail systems design; layouts for reports, outputs, and files; system development implementation and documentation. Students work on simulated case studies as a team to present solutions that reinforce the life cycle phases of systems analysis and design. Three class hours weekly.

C.S. 219     Database Management Systems     (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 225 or equivalent experience using database management software. Focuses on the organization and design of databases that satisfy MIS requirements using relational database management systems. Builds skill in entity relationship diagramming, database normalization, and structured query language. Course also discusses the administration of a database in a client/server environment. Projects are completed in microcomputer lab. Three class hours weekly.

C.S. 222     Programming in C/C++     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 120 or MATH 104 or MATH 114 or equivalent programming experience. Foundation course in use of high-level language. To support assigned laboratory exercises, includes use of full-screen editor, compiler, linker, execution environment of a C compiler/interpreter, top-down programming operators, arrays, loops, pointers, control statements, data structures, file processing, disk functions, sorting/searching, and recursion. Two lecture hours, two lab hours weekly.

C.S. 224     Operating Systems for Micros     (3)

For students with little computer experience, general introduction to computer software and Windows operating system applications, documents, managing files, word processing, graphics, customizing windows, accessories, networking, and the internet. Two lecture hours and two class hours weekly.

C.S. 225     Introduction to Networks     (3)

Recommended background: C.S. 120 or related computer experience. Local networks offer such features as high availability and the ability to support multiple vendor equipment. Broad background in principle architectural forms and design approaches. Three class hours weekly.

C.S. 228     Introduction to Unix/Linux     (3)

Recommended background: C.S. 120. Basic operating system concepts, command line programs and utilities, organization of files, processes control, multitasking, shell programming, system administration, the vi editor, and introduction to the basics of awk and perl programming for system administration. Students spend a portion of the class installing, configuring, and administering their own Linux system.

C.S. 235     Web Page Design and Development     (3)

Recommended background: BUS 225 or related computer experience. Course provides experience in planning and developing a web page. Students work with HTML and DHTML programming language, web browser, and web page editor as tools to develop a web application. Also introduces CSS and JavaScript programming to add dynamic components to web pages. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

C.S. 236     Advanced Visual Basic     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 200 or equivalent computer experience. Defines and teaches the basic skills of Visual Basic, including skills that enable students to browse, receive, and send objects via the internet and place text, pictures, animation, audio commentary; motion video clips; and stereo sound tracks. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

C.S. 237     Internet Security     (3)

Recommended background: C.S. 120 or related experience. Introduction to network security issues including access control, communications, internet and intranet. Step-by-step explanations of design and installation of firewalls and configuring into internet services. Buffer overruns and other software development errors will also be discussed.

C.S. 238     Java     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 120 or MATH 104 or MATH 114 or equivalent programming experience. Programs, exercises and projects focus on principles of software design and program clarity to solve real-world problems. The language uses object-oriented programming and graphical interface design. Provides graphical, animated, multimedia-based, audio-intensive, multi-threaded, network-based programs using extensive class libraries. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

C.S. 245     Programming in COBOL     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 120. Covers COBOL programming language concepts. Students use an online time sharing system to write, compile, debug, test and document programs of varying degrees of difficulty. Programs involve business-oriented applications including sequential files, index files, control breaks, table load and lookup, and on-line queries. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

C.S. 275     Computer Technologies Internship     (3)

Prerequisite: Students must have completed at least 15 credits in computer or computer-related courses and be approved by computer science faculty. This course will provide an opportunity for qualified students to connect classroom learning with practical work experience and develop skills at a job site. Students will identify their career skills and develop specific learning goals for the work assignment. Students will prepare an employment portfolio to present to employer sponsors. Relevant work experience is sponsored by an area employer for a minimum of 120 work hours and performed off campus. Class meetings per student/instructor/sponsor contract.

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Criminal Justice

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

C.J. 111     Introduction to Justice Systems     (3)

Comprehensive survey of justice systems including historical, organizational, social, functional and administrative aspects. Provides the background and principles to introduce students to succeeding specialized courses. Three class hours weekly.

C.J. 112     Organization and Administration of Justice Systems     (3)

Covers the techniques of organization and administration within public safety areas. Also covers organizational control, leadership motivation and goals and the study of future trends. Three class hours weekly. Spring semester only.

C.J. 115     Criminal Law     (3)

Provides the student with a working knowledge of the NYS Penal Law, its application and enforcement, and its introduction into the court system. Also instructs the student on selected NYS Criminal Procedural Law sections that are applicable in the instruction of the Penal Law. Fall semester only.

C.J. 117     Juvenile Delinquency     (3)

Considers factors related to delinquency and crime, problems of treatment within institutions, and the organization and administration of delinquency prevention programs at the state, county and local level. Examines juvenile court procedures and control programs. Three class hours weekly.

C.J. 119     Criminal Investigations     (3)

Includes the theory of an investigation, report preparation, conduct at scenes, the collection and preservation of physical evidence, proper investigation of most major crimes and related incidents. Also studies recent innovations in the investigation field. Three class hours weekly. Spring and Summer only.

C.J. 121     Institutional Corrections     (3)

Comprehensive study of the origin and development of the philosophy of treatment, administration and structure of the correctional system; legal basis of treatment; institutional training and treatment programs, focusing on today's correctional institutions. Three class hours weekly.

C.J. 123     Laws of Evidence     (3)

Focuses on the preparation of evidence for court procedures. Covers preparation of materials, responsibilities and conduct of the officer in court with illustrative cases. Discussion of contemporary court issues with a possibility of actual participation in a courtroom. Three class hours weekly. Fall semester only.

C.J. 165     International Studies: Public Safety in Great Britain     (3)

International study course features intensive two-week series of tours, lectures, and discussions. Participants explore British public safety issues and their historical and cultural influences and compare trends in American and British systems of public safety and law. Visits include Inns of Court, Royal Courts of Justice, Parliament House, police and fire stations, and sites not open to the general public. For criminal justice majors and others in law, law enforcement, and public safety fields. Intersession only.

C.J. 211     Case Studies in Criminal Behavior     (3)

Prerequisite: C.J. 111. Covers material from the crime to the institutionalization of the criminal. Intensive case analysis shows various types of crime and the methods, treatment and supervision of the individual. Three class hours weekly. Spring semester only.

C.J. 213     Community Corrections     (3)

Prerequisite: C.J. 121. Comprehensive survey and examination of New York State correctional structure and its relationship to probation and parole. Examines community treatment in the correctional process, focusing on pre-sentence investigation and selection, supervision and release of probationers and parolees. Includes historical development of probation and parole, alternative treatment methods and analysis of current supervision philosophies.

C.J. 220     Criminology     (3)

Prerequisite: CJ 111. Studies the causes of crime and detection and treatment methods. Also covers the historical approach and modern methods. Three class hours weekly.

C.J. 222     Constitutional Law     (3)

Prerequisite: CJ 111. Traces the history of common law and development of case law in the United States. Development of an individual's constitutional rights is explored through Supreme Court cases. History of the Exclusionary Rule is followed through cases that changed its application. Controlling cases that apply the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments of the Constitution are studied. Three class hours weekly. Spring semester only.

C.J. 239     Critical Issues in Criminal Justice     (3)

Prerequisite: C.J. 111. Course will be devoted to selected contemporary or critical issues surrounding the field and profession of criminal justice. It may take on a particular theme or related themes in criminal justice, or a particular area of criminal justice. This course may be used as a free elective towards the criminal justice program elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a criminal justice requirement without permission of the division chair. Three class hours weekly.

C.J. 265     Internship in Criminal Justice     (3)

Offered to criminal justice majors in cooperation within all the various criminal justice fields. Students have on-the-job training at the selected agency in the area of major interest. Students may participate with the respective Division Chair's authorization and must have maintained a minimum of a 3.0 GPA. In-service students may not perform independent study in the area of their regular employment. Course is limited to 3rd or 4th semester students with approval from the Division Chair. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations. Offered upon indication of need.

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Drafting

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

DRFT 122     Mechanical / Industrial CAD     (4)

Prerequisite: ENGR 126 or equivalent. Focuses on mechanical design principles and practices in various specialized areas of mechanical/industrial drafting. Topics include bearings and shafts, gearing and cams, threads, fasteners, and springs. Introduces industrial dimensioning and tolerancing principles based on ANSI Y14.5M standards. Detailed representation is accomplished using two- and three-dimensional drawing techniques. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

DRFT 125     Architectural Drafting     (4)

Recommended background: ENGR 126. Introduces students to basic concepts and techniques related to wood-frame construction. Focuses on methods and materials employed in the construction industry for a residential or light commercial building. Students prepare a complete set of architectural construction documents during a semester-long project. Computer-aided drafting will be used in the lab. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

DRFT 220     Machine Design     (4)

Prerequisite: DRFT 122 and ENGR 103, 228 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 104. Using case studies and industrial design problems, students learn to lay out engineered products and systems and prepare drawings and specifications necessary for developing production layouts and details. Emphasis on problem-solving, layout design practices, tolerance stacks, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, design concepts, procedures, data and decision analysis, and techniques required for machine design drafting of component parts. Computer-aided design and standard machine design practices are used in the laboratory. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

DRFT 221     Tool and Die Design     (4)

Prerequisite: DRFT 122, ENGR 103, 126, 228. Concurrent enrollment in MATH 104. Using case studies and industrial design problems, students learn to improve manufacturing processes through tool design techniques. Includes problem-solving techniques, process analysis, designing fixtures and jigs, introduction to punch and die sets, quality improvements in manufacturing, and introduction to geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Computer-aided design will be used in the laboratory. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

DRFT 230     Process Piping Design     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGR 126. Instructs students in the design principles and standards required for process piping systems for chemical process plants and industrial power plants. Topics include piping, fitting and valve specification; process equipment, pipe support and instrumentation; and the fundamental principles of fluid mechanics. Two class hours and two lab hours weekly.

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Early Childhood

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ECH 101     Introduction to Early Childhood Education     (3)

Concurrent enrollment in ECH 103 or 106 is required. Recommended background: PSY 215. Course examines the history and development of early childhood education as well as current trends and issues. The needs of the young child (age 0 to 8) will be studied for the purpose of applying the principles of growth and development to the use of appropriate methods, materials and activities. The development of skills to work with children, parents and the community will be emphasized. Three class hours weekly.

ECH 102     Curriculum and Assessment in Early Childhood Education     (3)

Prerequisite: ECH 101 and 110. Concurrent enrollment required with ECH 104 or 105. A continuation of ECH 101, this course examines various aspects of early childhood education with an emphasis on classroom management, multiculturalism, inclusion, and parent and community involvement. Issues such as assessment, philosophy of teaching, record-keeping and curriculum will also be addressed. Students will begin to apply the principles of early childhood education to the development of lessons and thematic units. Three class hours weekly.

ECH 103     Early Childhood Field Experience I     (3)

Concurrent enrollment with ECH 101 required. Prerequisites: ECH 110. & GPA of 2.3. Course provides practical experience with three- and four-year-old children in Head Start programs. Students gain knowledge about early childhood programs, trends, and philosophies while observing and working in Head Start classrooms serving three- and four-year-olds. Students observe early childhood settings in the community on a weekly basis for the entire semester. In addition to 20 hours of seminar/lecture hours, students complete 7 hours of fieldwork weekly for a minimum of 100 hours of fieldwork. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

ECH 104     Early Childhood Field Experience II     (3)

Concurrent enrollment with ECH 102 required. Prerequisites: ECH 110 and 103 or 106 & GPA of 2.3. Provides additional practical experience with children from five to eight years of age in an elementary school setting with an emphasis on increased involvement with children. Students develop lessons and materials and are expected to assume an active role in the teaching process by presenting their lessons and materials in the classroom. In addition to seminar/lecture hours, students complete 7 hours of fieldwork weekly for a total of 100 hours of fieldwork. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

ECH 105     Early Childhood Field Experience for Liberal Arts Majors     (2)

Concurrent enrollment with ECH 102 required. Prerequisites: ECH 106 and 110 & GPA of 2.3. Provides practical experience with three- and four-year-old children in an early childhood setting. Students gain knowledge about early childhood programs by working in classrooms serving three- and four-year-olds. Students observe in community settings on a weekly basis for the entire semester. In addition to seminar/lecture hours, students complete 6 hours of fieldwork weekly for a total of 80 hours of fieldwork. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

ECH 106     Field Experience: Early Childhood     (1)

Taken concurrently with ECH 101 by Early Childhood concentration students, Early Childhood Certificate students, and students taking the course as a free elective. Provides practical experience with children from birth through 8 years of age in a variety of early childhood settings. Students observe in classrooms serving infants, toddlers, preschoolers, children with special needs, and kindergarten, first and second grade. Students observe on a weekly basis for the entire semester (three hours field experience weekly) for a minimum of 30 hours and also complete five seminar hours. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

ECH 110     Methods and Materials for Early Childhood Education     (3)

Concurrent enrollment in EDU 120 recommended. This course examines the methods and materials used in early childhood classrooms. Special emphasis is placed on the selection, development, and use of a variety of teaching materials. Topics include learning centers, games, manipulatives, visuals, classroom design, computer resources, films/videos, music, bulletin boards, and professional journals/resources. Three class hours weekly.

ECH 111     Infants and Toddlers     (3)

Examination of programs, methods and materials utilized in early childhood education programs serving children from six weeks to three years of age. Special emphasis will be placed on the selection, development, and use of strategies that foster the emotional, physical, social and cognitive development of infants and toddlers. Students must complete 20 hours of observation in infant/toddler programs. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

ECH 222     Teaching Math & Science to Young Children     (3)

Prerequisites: Math 099 or pass placement test for Math 099, and ECH 110. Examines developmentally appropriate theory and methods for teaching math and science to young children. Hands-on experiences will facilitate the planning and implementation of math and science into the early childhood curriculum. Classroom visits to off-campus sites providing early childhood programs will be required. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

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Economics

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ECON 102     Personal Money Management     (3)

For students who desire knowledge in managing their personal finances. Topics include budgeting; saving; borrowing; home purchasing; automobile purchasing; life, auto and home insurance; health, disability and retirement programs; estate planning; and investing. Three class hours weekly.

ECON 201     Introduction to Economics I     (3)

Introduces macroeconomics and covers how societies choose to allocate scarce resources within the context of the whole economic system. Focuses on how markets function, various macroeconomic theories, the role of government in an economic system, the international economy, the role of money in an economic system, and the policy responses to the problems of inflation, unemployment and slow economic growth. Three class hours weekly.

ECON 202     Introduction to Economics II     (3)

Recommended background: ECON 201. Focuses on the microeconomic structure of our economy including supply and demand theory, individual firm and market theory, and factor market analysis. Topics may include international trade and finance, government regulation, labor-management relations, and the economics of energy and the environment. Three class hours weekly.

ECON 203     Introduction to Labor-Management Relations     (3)

Recommended background: ECON 201. Introduces the history and ideology of the American labor movement, collective bargaining, contract administration, dispute resolution, labor legislation and relevant economic theory. Studies contemporary labor-management issues and problems within this topical framework. Students are involved in case studies, simulation exercises, field trips, and class discussion. Guest speakers are invited. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ECON 205     Money and Banking     (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 201. Covers the history and functions of money and credit, commercial banking, central banking, monetary theory, other banking and credit institutions, and international banking. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

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Education

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

EDU 120     Technology for Teachers     (1)

Concurrent enrollment in ECH 110 recommended for all Early Childhood programs (associate degree, certificate, or concentration). Surveys classroom applications of technology with emphasis on use by the teacher.

EDU 202     Foundations of American Education     (4)

Examines issues of education and the social, historical, philosophical, political, and cultural foundations which influenced their development; also examines the social purposes of education through social and behavioral sciences; explores the impact of social differences on education; helps the student develop a personal philosophy of education; and examines the relationship of schooling to democratic principles. Students must complete 30 hours of observation in classrooms based on their chosen area of interest: Childhood-1st through 6th grade or Adolescence-7th through 12th grade. Students observe 2 hours per week for the entire semester; students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

EDU 203     Field Experience: Childhood/Adolescence     (1)

Prerequisite: EDU 201. Practical experience with children in grades 1-12 in a school setting. Students observe in classrooms based on their chosen area of interest (Childhood: grades 1-6; or Adolescence: grades 7-12). Students observe on a weekly basis for the entire semester (two hours fieldwork weekly) for a minimum of 30 hours. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations. This course is only open to students transferring a Foundations of American Education course from another institution that does not include the required number of fieldwork hours.

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Electronics

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ELEC 101     Electrical Circuits     (4)

Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 102. Focuses on the general principles of DC and AC circuitry with emphasis on the use of multimeters and oscilloscopes. Introduces a computer simulation program to aid the students in validating their experimental results and developing troubleshooting skills. Required of students enrolled in Electrical Technology and recommended to all students desiring a beginning course in electronics. No prior electronics knowledge is necessary. Two class hours and two two-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 102     Basic Electronics     (4)

Prerequisite: ELEC 101. Introduces the diode and transistor semiconductor devices within the applications of rectification, amplification, and advanced waveform shaping. Emphasis on multimeters and oscilloscopes throughout the experimental and simulation experiments. Two class hours and two two-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 104     Electronics Drafting with CADD     (3)

Studies the drafting principles and practices used in electrical and electronic design. Introduces students to the fundamentals of engineering drawings including the use of standards, orthographic projection, and dimensioning. Provides students with a basic understanding of computer aided drafting and design. Focuses on using CADD systems in the preparation of schematic diagrams, logic diagrams, connection diagrams, PLC diagrams, printed circuit board design, and electronic packaging design. Two class hours and three lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ELEC 105     Introduction to Digital Computers     (4)

Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 102 or equivalent. Concentrates on digital integrated circuits including logic gates, arithmetic circuits, flip-flops, latches, registers, and memories. Focuses on schematic analysis of a simple digital computer to complement the students' troubleshooting development and understanding of the application of digital circuits. Emphasis on logic pulsers and probes test equipment for the laboratory work, and logic analyzers for the computer simulation experiments. No prior electronics knowledge is necessary. Two class hours and two two-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 107     Fundamentals of Microcomputers     (4)

Prerequisite: ELEC 105. Introduces the internal structure of microprocessors through assembly language programming exercises. Emphasizes roles of hardware and software within a microcomputer through interfacing experiments between the microprocessor and various peripheral devices. Compares the features between the 8-, 16- and 32-bit microprocessors on the market. Two class hours and two 2-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 201     Intermediate Electronics     (4)

Prerequisite: ELEC 102. Focuses on oscillators, operational amplifiers, power amplifiers, Field Effect Transistors (FETs), 555-timers. Emphasizes use of multimeters and oscilloscopes for experimental and computer simulation troubleshooting exercises. Two class hours and two two-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 204     Industrial Electronics     (4)

Prerequisite: ELEC 201. Focus on power control and instrumentation; emphasis on applying electronic concepts from ELEC 101, 102, 105, 201. Topics include schematics, ladder diagrams, varistors, thermistors, UJTs, DIACs, TRIACs, SCRs, hall effect sensors, photo transmitters and detectors, pressure sensors, proximity detectors, optoisolators, relays, solid state relays, timers, timing relays, solenoids, temperature sensing devices, motors. Two class hours, two two-hour labs weekly.

ELEC 207     Semiconductor Manufacturing Process Overview     (3)

Recommended background or concurrent enrollment: CHEM 101. Overview of the fabrication and operation of integrated circuits and MicroElectroMechanical (MEM) devices. The course covers the process, materials, and equipment used in semiconductor manufacturing. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ELEC 208     Radio Frequency Communication     (4)

Prerequisite: ELEC 102. Focus on comparison of time-domain equipment (oscilloscopes, time-domain reflectometers) to frequency-domain equipment (spectrum and network analyzers). Applications of AM/FM modulation and impedance matching, characterization of microwave systems (introduces reflection coefficient, voltage standing wave ratio, insertion loss, S-parameters, Smith chart). Introduces soldering techniques, schematic interpretation, and, through computer simulations, operations behind spectrum and network analyzer test equipment. Three class hours, one two-hour lab weekly.

ELEC 209     Programmable Logic Controllers     (3)

Prerequisite: ELEC 105. Focus on sequential programmable logic controllers applied to industrial processes: ladder diagrams, input/output devices, application programming design of beginning through advanced functions. Introduces a PLC simulation program to gain experience in configuring and troubleshooting software programs. Three class hours weekly.

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Engineering

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ENGR 103     Manufacturing Materials and Processes     (3)

Introduces the materials and manufacturing processes with which designers, technicians and engineers must be familiar. Includes introduction to safety, measurement, materials, metal cutting technology, and metallurgy, and introduction to standard material removal processes including drilling, milling, lathe work, surface finishing operations, and some advanced technologies. Three class hours weekly.

ENGR 130     Renewable and Alternative Energy Systems     (3)

Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or high school Earth Science and Math 099 or equivalent. Provides an overview of alternative energy sources and their ability to meet energy needs. The fundamental concepts of solar, wind, geothermal and other sustainable energy sources will be covered. The availability, economics and environmental impact of these alternative sources will be compared. Three class hours weekly.

ENGR 126     Computer-Aided Design     (4)

Develops basic drafting skills using microcomputer CAD systems. Provides the skills to develop detail drawings, including orthographic projection and application of standard dimensioning practices. Drawing assignments use CAD system operators to draw, modify, dimension and plot two-dimensional part drawings. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

ENGR 203     Applied Statics and Strength of Materials     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 104. Develops the procedures and methods necessary for studying the effects of forces on structural and mechanical systems, as well as the material strengths required to safely resist these forces. Studies friction, motion, forces and their effects, concepts of stress and strain, shear, and the reaction of materials to temperature, unusual environments, and mechanical loading. Four class hours weekly.

ENGR 207     Quality Assurance     (3)

This course presents the basic concepts and practical applications of quality assurance in manufacturing. Studies the components of a measurement system and the use of common measurement equipment. An introduction to probability and statistics precedes the study of statistical process control. Covers quality concepts and quality systems, inspection of parts using engineering drawing specifications, as well as a variety of statistical techniques, including: control charts for variables, control charts for attributes, Pareto diagrams, and process capability studies. Two lecture hours/two lab hours weekly.

ENGR 208     Computer Numerical Control     (4)

Prerequisite: ENGR 103, 228 and MATH 104. Prepares students with the necessary skills to program CNC machine tools. The industry standard EIA RS-274D "G and M Code" programming is used to produce a part on the CNC equipment. Lectures cover CAD/CAM applications, programming, sub-routines, tooling, work holding and cutting theory. The laboratory allows students to practice by programming and machining parts. Three class hours and two lab hours weekly.

ENGR 220     Construction Methods and Materials     (4)

Prerequisite: ENGR 126 and DRFT 125. Introduces basic construction materials, their properties, manufacture and application to the building industry. Focuses on the proper design of various building elements-foundations, floors, walls and roofs-and the selection of suitable building materials and products. Three class hours and two lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGR 221     Building Mechanical and Electrical Systems     (4)

Prerequisites: ENGR 126 and DRFT 125. Familiarizes students with systems which must be engineered and safely integrated into a building: hot water heating, HVAC, water supply, sanitary and storm drainage, lighting, electrical supply, and occupant safety systems. In the laboratory, students design and lay out a heating, cooling, water supply, sanitary drainage, storm drainage, lighting and electrical system for an industrial building. Three class hours and two lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGR 228     Computer Aided Drafting III -Solid Modeling     (3)

Assumes basic knowledge of computer-aided drafting and design concepts and proficiency in using system menus to create 2- and 3-dimensional drawings. Covers 3D solid modeling sketching, profiling, constraining, dimensioning, viewing, editing, revolving, sweeping, lofting, and other advanced techniques, solid assembly modeling with advanced drawing creation, and annotation techniques. Techniques and assembly drawings are the main focus. Two class hours and two lab hours weekly.

ENGR 251     Special Topics in Engineering Technology     (1)

Devoted to a specific topic or area of study in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Technology. Provides an opportunity for in depth study in an area not covered in other engineering technology courses. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGR 253     Special Topics in Engineering Technology     (3)

Devoted to a specific topic or area of study in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Technology. Provides an opportunity for in depth study in an area not covered in other engineering technology courses. Offered upon indication of need.

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English

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ENGL 049     English Skills     (No Credit)

Reinforces ENGL 098 with additional instruction and practice in lab settings with word processing. Instructors meet with students individually to identify skill needs and work on areas of deficiency. Students must register concurrently in a paired section of ENGL 098. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 097     Fundamentals of Reading     (No Credit)

Designed to assist students in developing reading skills so they are prepared to handle college-level reading materials. Students are presented with techniques in vocabulary development and comprehension skills as well as strategies for learning from college textbooks. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 098     Fundamentals of Writing     (No Credit)

Designed for the study and improvement of basic writing skills and techniques, focusing on grammar, the sentence, the paragraph and short essay. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 101     Freshman English I     (3)

Basic composition course includes reading expository prose and short stories, writing expository themes, and practicum research techniques. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: Based on academic preparation and placement test results, ENGL 097 and/or ENGL 098 may be required before enrolling in ENGL 101.

ENGL 102     Freshman English II     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Continuation of ENGL 101. Includes introduction to literature (novel, drama, poetry) and writing critical themes based on readings. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 104     Advanced Expository Writing     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Designed to improve the ability to write effectively in expository and argumentative composition. Appropriate forms of discourse, methods of organization, support, style and logic. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: Course may be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required English courses. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGL 110     Writing Research in the Discipline     (1)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Provides intensive instruction in the writing of research in specific disciplines: behavioral and social sciences, natural sciences, business, humanities, etc. Three class hours per week for five weeks. NOTE: Course cannot be taken in lieu of any required English course.

ENGL 150     College Reading and Study Skills     (3)

Improves understanding of the learning process for more effective reading and studying. Presents theories, techniques and practice in reading comprehension, organization, vocabulary development, textbook analysis, library and research skills, study and listening habits. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May not be taken in lieu of a required English course.

ENGL 165     Literary London     (3)

Recommended background: ENGL 101-102. Literary London is an intensive, on-site course that examines London through the lens of selected samples of English Literature. In the manner of Chaucer, modern day literary pilgrims will travel to various London sites that they will explore through the poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama of various periods of British literature (medieval to contemporary). Tours, lectures, discussions, and walks will locate the literature students read in a specific place while the literary pieces will deepen students' understanding of the history, geography, and culture of the city.

ENGL 201-206

Depending upon curriculum, one or more of these courses must be taken to satisfy the English requirement in literature.

ENGL 201     World Literature I     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Surveys significant writings in world literature with focus on values, techniques and major movements in literature from ancient to early modern. Analyzes literary, cultural, historical and philosophical impact of the works on diverse images of human identity. Includes works and writers such as ancient Egyptian poetry, Hebrew Bible, Bhagavad-Gita, Qu'ran, Plato, Confucius, Ferdowski, Shikibu and the No Theater. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 202     World Literature II     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Continues from ENGL 201 to focus on poetry, short stories, plays and short novels of major writers from modern to contemporary works. Analysis and evaluation of historical, literary and cultural values includes such writers as Tagore, Joyce, Tuquan, Basho, Senghor, Mahfouz, Neruda, Achebe and Soyinka. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 203     American Literature to the Late 19th Century     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Surveys significant writing from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries in American literature. Analysis includes the general movements of thought, literary techniques and themes revealed in the works of representative writers. Also may consider selected works of late 19th and turn-of-the-century writers. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 204     American Literature Late 19th Century to Present     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Continuation of ENGL 203. Surveys American prose, poetry, and drama in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Analysis includes the general movements of thought, literary techniques and themes revealed in the works of representative writers. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 205     English Literature to the 19th Century     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Surveys literature of England from Beowulf, tracing major contributions and movements. Historical, philosophical and aesthetic influences of significant writers, and development of poetry and drama as genres through Beowulf, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Dryden, Pope, Swift and Johnson. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 206     English Literature 19th Century to Present     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Survey of English literature analyzes development of poetry, drama and novel as genres. Presents significant philosophical, historical and aesthetic influences; emphasis on such figures as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, Carlyle, Shaw, Conrad, Yeats and Eliot. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 207     Shakespeare     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Studies Shakespeare's dramatic art through his treatment of character, theme, form, and structure. Readings include early and later tragedies, comedies, histories, and non-dramatic works. Includes focus on Shakespeare as a representative of Elizabethan England. Papers required on topics such as biographical materials, dramatic companies, theatres, sources, criticism. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses. Alternate academic years.

ENGL 209     Children's Literature     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Survey course covers traditional and contemporary children's literature. Fairy tales and other works emerging from oral tradition, picture books, poetry, juvenile novels, and non-fiction and informational books are all considered, for both general literary qualities and what they offer to children. Course develops critical perceptiveness. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: Required for Early Childhood students and for those planning a career in elementary education. May also be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses.

ENGL 211     Creative Writing     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 102, required. Develops the abilities of students interested in creative writing with an emphasis on the techniques used in writing modern short stories and poems. Practice is provided in preparing manuscripts for possible publication. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of any required English course.

ENGL 217     Media Writing     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. A basic course focusing on writing and preparing information for the mass media. Covers techniques for writing for print (newspaper and magazine), broadcast (radio and television), advertising, public relations and online media. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a required English course.

ENGL 221     Effective Speech: Public Address     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Designed to develop an ability to meet, with some ease and competence, demands for speaking by the educated person: concepts, physical behavior, vocal quality, preparation, organization; development and delivery of basic types of public speeches. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: Course is required in certain curricula and may be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a required literature course.

ENGL 222     Effective Speech: Group Discussion     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. The theories and principles of group communication. Designed to enable students to develop problem-solving, decision-making, conflict management, and leadership skills in group situations. Students participate in group projects to set goals, plan strategies, and present results. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: Course is required in certain curricula and may be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a required literature course.

ENGL 226     Contemporary American Novels     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Representative writers of post-World War II America, focusing on the ways that novels reflect contemporary society. Selected writers include Norman Mailer, Saul Bellow, Flannery O'Connor, Robert Penn Warren, John Updike, Eudora Welty, John O'Hara, Truman Capote, Philip Roth and others. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGL 227     Poetry: Poems and Poets     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 102, required. Detailed introduction to the poetry genre through reading, listening to, discussing, and writing about poems and poets. Not confined to any period or nationality; rather, considers a wide range of possibilities, styles and concerns of poetry. Special attention to the work of selected poets, both old and new, for a sense of individuality and variety of vision and language. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be taken as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of any required English course.

ENGL 230     The Bible as Literature     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Literary survey of the Bible including epic literature, lyric poetry, epistolary literature, wisdom literature and prophetic literature. The course's intent is to present a non-theological approach to Bible study with emphasis on its literary merit as evidenced through the various types of literature previously listed. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses. Alternate academic years.

ENGL 231     Comics as Literature     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 102, required. Analysis of the comic book in terms of its unique poetics (interplay of word and image); themes suggested in various works; history and development of the form and its subgenres, expectations of readers. Also explores the influence of history, culture, and economics on comic book artists and writers, definitions of "literature," how these apply to comic books, and the resulting tensions.

ENGL 234     Captivity, Punishment, and Torture     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101-102. Issues of captivity, punishment, and torture are addressed through the discipline of the Humanities. Exploring human constructs and concerns through memoir, biography, and fiction, includes experiences of captives; forms of punishment from corporal to incarceration to capital punishment; definitions of torture; impact on survivors, effectiveness in obtaining information, and making torture acceptable to the torturer and civil society.

ENGL 235     Women and Writing     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 102, required. Explores the relationship between women and writing and the challenge writing has posed for women. Focus is on writing by women; also considers how women have been represented by men. Features such 19th- and 20th-century writers as Charlotte Bronte, Mary Shelley, Edith Wharton, Emily Dickinson, Jane Austen, and Toni Morrison. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 237     Film and Literature     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 102, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 102, required. The relationships between film and literature, particularly novels adapted for the screen. Reading of selected novels and some plays, viewing film versions, discussion and analysis. Three class hours weekly. Note: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of any required English course.

ENGL 238     Special Topics     (1)

Recommended background: ENGL 101-102. Devoted to a theme or topic in literature of language or to the works of a major writer or select group of writers. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses. Three class hours weekly for five weeks or equivalent.

ENGL 239     Special Topics     (3)

Recommended background: ENGL 101-102. Devoted to a theme or topic in literature of language or to the works of a major writer or group of writers. NOTE: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 240     Mythology     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101.A survey of representative cosmogonies, major deities, and hero tales: Graeco-Roman, Teutonic, Middle Eastern, North and South American, and Asiatic. The course considers the descriptive tales and the polytheistic concepts of at least one representative culture from each major area. Three class hours weekly. NOTE: This course may be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective but cannot be taken in lieu of required literature courses.

ENGL 245     African-American Literary Traditions     (3)

Recommended background: ENGL 101-102. Examines the content, form, and literary devices and techniques of selected African-American literature from slavery to contemporary; fosters an understanding of negative consequences of racial stereotyping. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ENGL 247     Native American Myth, Legend, and Literature     (3)

Introduces Native American creation myths and trickster tales. Follows the development of myth and legend into a distinctive Native American literary form, covering pertinent Native American culture and history. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 250     Folklore     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Survey of American folklore through place names, mining camps and mines, cattle brands, quilt names, Ozark fiddle tunes, racehorses, hound dog names, nicknames. Considers children's folklore, street cries, legends, epitaphs, folk songs, ballads, superstitions; focus on the uniting qualities of American folklore. Three class hours weekly. Note: May be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a required literature course. Alternate academic years.

ENGL 255     Science Fiction and Fantasy     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Recommended background: ENGL 102. This introduction to the historical background of science fiction explores the relationship between science fiction and classical horror and fantasy literature, and suggests critical methodologies for reading and writing about such material. Students are asked to enjoy this literature, view it critically, and note how it reflects concerns not only for the future but also for its own cultural time period. Three class hours weekly.

ENGL 260     Professional Writing Practicum     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. This course introduces students to several forms of professional writing, such as grant writing and publicity writing that call for higher level writing skills. Students then gain professional experience by working with actual clients and developing written material to accommodate their needs.

ENGL 270     Technical Writing     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101. Designed to help students understand the process of creating, shaping, and communicating technical information so that people can use it safely, effectively, and efficiently. Students will learn that technical documents are addressed to particular readers; technical documents help those readers solve problems, are part of an organizational context, are often created collaboratively, using design to increase readability, and involve graphics. Students will practice writing technical documents that are honest, clear, accurate, comprehensive, accessible, concise, professional in appearance, and correct. Such documents may include memos, email, and letters; instructions; definitions and descriptions; proposals and formal written reports; job application material including cover letters and resumes. NOTE: This course may be used as an English or Liberal Arts elective but cannot be taken in lieu of required English courses.

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Entrepreneurial Studies

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ENTR 200     The Entre-preneurial Process     (3)

Covers the role of social and economic entrepreneurship and its impact on local, regional, national, and global cultures and economies. Students will evaluate the skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture, and will review the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship as a career choice, as well as entrance strategies to achieve the goal. Students can explore areas and projects of interest individually and in teams. Three class hours weekly.

ENTR 202     Innovation and Creativity     (3)

This course is designed to have the student learn the value of innovation and creativity in achieving successful outcomes. They will investigate the relationship between entrepreneurial thinking and the creative mindset that leads to idea generation and new venture creation. The student will explore the factors that inspire and promote creativity in individuals and organizations. The student will develop skills and techniques for working in teams to find innovative solutions to existing and emerging challenges applicable to profit and non-profit entities. Four contact hours.

ENTR 204     Social Entrepreneurship & Non-Profit Management     (3)

This course is designed to have the student learn the process of recognizing and pursuing opportunities to create social value. The student will learn to be more innovative, resourceful and results-oriented. They will learn to draw upon the best thinking in both the business and non-profit worlds to develop strategies that maximize their social impact. Effective administrative and management techniques and practices will also be explored as they apply to social enterprises. Three contact hours per week.

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French

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

FREN 101-102, 103-104

Elementary and intermediate foreign languages begin in the fall as a year sequence. Students who need a full year should be aware of this. When in doubt about placement, seek advice from foreign language faculty or the Humanities Division chair.

FREN 101-102     Elementary French I-II     (4 / Semester)

First-level comprehensive courses build a foundation in communication through necessary structures and vocabulary to function in everyday situations. The four skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) are developed through class, labs, and assignments. Films, computer games, word processing, interactive videos and simple readings provide information on the French-speaking world and reinforce the curriculum. Recommended for beginning students to meet a foreign language requirement for degree or career. (Students who have had French through Regents level may not enroll in FREN 101-102.) Three class hours weekly/required lab. FREN 101 is the prerequisite for FREN 102.

FREN 103-104     Intermediate French I-II     (3 / Semester)

Reviews and refines understanding of the structures of French, broadens the speaking and reading vocabulary and comprehension, and develops writing ability. Emphasis is on communication. Films, interactive videos, tapes, readings, word processing and computer programs are used as support materials. Recommended for students with a year of college French, high school Regents French, or two strong years of high school French. Three class hours weekly. FREN 103 is the prerequisite for FREN 104.

FREN 111-112     Conversational French I-II     (3 / Semester)

Level I: no prerequisite. Level II presupposes basic knowledge of French. Elementary conversation course primarily for developing oral comprehension and expression. Includes reading, writing and structural considerations; evaluation is based largely on oral performance. Three class hours weekly.

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Geographic Information Systems

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

GIS 101     Foundations of Geographic Information Science     (3)

Fundamental concepts of spatial understanding and analysis for non-GIS majors. Introduces basic principles of GIS (Geographic Information Systems), RS (Remote Sensing), and GPS (Global Positioning System) and their applications in exploring and analyzing geospatial information. Students apply geographic information technologies to collect, manipulate, integrate, visualize, and analyze spatial data to generate information for solving complex problems. Hands-on lab training reinforces conceptual elements explained and discussed in lectures. Two lecture hours and two lab hours weekly.

GIS 110     Human Geography     (3)

Human Geography is the study of the relationship between human and physical environments. The course examines the interrelationship between geography and culture and the nature of the impact of physical environment upon cultural development.

GIS 111     Introduction to GIS     (3)

Introductory course presents basic GIS theories and concepts. Fundamentals explored include a brief introduction to basic cartographic principles, data types, map scales, coordinate systems and projections. Hands-on training includes manipulating, analyzing, and creating maps using an industry-standard GIS system. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly. Fall semester only.

GIS 121     Remote Sensing and Aerial Photogrammetry     (3)

Overview of theory and principles of remote sensing and aerial photogrammetry. Students learn how to use remotely sensed images in resource exploration and base mapping. Introduces fundamentals of photogrammetry, basic image interpretation, and classification techniques. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly. Spring semester only.

GIS 122     Spatial Modeling with Raster GIS     (3)

Recommended background: GIS 111. Part of a sequence of GIS courses; provides hands-on training in modeling and analysis of spatial data using a raster GIS. Offers an in-depth understanding of raster GIS capabilities and helps students apply GIS technologies more effectively in spatial analysis and modeling. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly. Spring semester only.

GIS 205     Introduction to Vector GIS     (3)

Recommended background: GIS 101 or GIS 111. Introduction to vector GIS, particularly ArcGIS. Functional and analytical capabilities of ArcGIS are introduced. Building on GIS 111 fundamentals, students learn data query, manipulation, integration, and analysis techniques in the vector domain. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly. Fall semester only.

GIS 220     Advanced GIS     (3)

Prerequisite: GIS 205. Upper-level GIS course focuses on advanced topics including planning, management, raster-vector integration, and data quality issues. Students learn how to do customization, spatial modeling, advanced editing and database query in an ArcGIS environment. Combines components of geographic information technologies from previous semesters. Two class hours, two lab hours weekly. Spring semester only.

GIS 222     GIS Programming     (3)

Recommended background: CS 200 and GIS 205. Introduces basic structure and capabilities of object-oriented programming in a GIS environment. Students learn how to automate GIS operations and customize user interface using programming language available in ArcGIS. Three class hours weekly. Spring semester only.

GIS 251     Special Topics     (1)

Brief overview of geographic information technologies (GIT). Basic theories and principles of a particular aspect of GIT are discussed. Students gain hands-on experience in collecting, editing, and manipulating spatial or geographic data for viewing and analysis. Ten class hours, ten lab hours. Offered upon indication of need.

GIS 252     Special Topics     (2)

Introduction to geographic information technologies (GIT). Basic theories and applications of GIS and GPS are discussed and students gain hands-on training in collecting, editing, manipulating, processing, and analyzing spatial or geographic data for various applications. Ten class hours, ten lab hours weekly for two weeks or in any other combination. Offered upon indication of need.

GIS 253     Special Topics     (3)

Extensive experience in applying geographic information technologies (GIT) includes basic theories and applications with hands-on training in collecting, editing, manipulating, processing, and integrating spatial or geographic data from diverse sources for analysis and modeling. Ten class hours, ten lab hours weekly for three weeks or any other combination. Offered upon indication of need.

GIS 275     Internship in GIS     (3)

Prerequisite: GIS 111 or 101 and GIS 121 or equivalent experience. Individual study and field experience applying GIS technology in a work place setting. Requires a minimum of six hours weekly at an internship site and a biweekly class meeting for a progress report. Requires a summary presentation and a journal of on-site activities. Offered upon indication of need.

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Geography

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

GEOG 051     The Middle East     (1)

Seeks to explain the conflict between the Arab world and Israel. Examines the conflict's causes and the Palestinian refugee question. Also covers geographic significance of the region and oil politics. Three class hours weekly for five weeks. Offered upon indication of need.

GEOG 101     World Geography     (3)

Introduction to modern geography examines selected social, economic, political and military aspects of Europe, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and, if time permits, Asia or Latin America. Three class hours weekly.

GEOG 105     The United States     (3)

Study of U.S. regions including Alaska. Discusses current trends in population growth, migration, urbanization and resource use. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

GIS 110     Human Geography     (3)

See the course description under Geographical Information Systems.

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Geology

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

GEOL 101     Earth Science     (3)

Introduces selected topics in geology, meteorology and astronomy with emphasis on current environmental issues as related to these fields. An entry-level course in earth science. Two class hours and one two-hour lab weekly.

GEOL 110     Physical Geology     (4)

Recommended background: GEOL 101 or high school earth science. General survey course in the basic principles of physical geology with in-depth coverage of selected topics such as streams, glaciers, ground water, weathering, soils, mass wasting, structural deformation, earthquakes and volcanoes. Laboratory exercises focus on rock and mineral identification, topographic and aerial map interpretation. Six field trips and a field project are designed to emphasize local geology. Three class hours and one three-hour lab or field trip weekly.

GEOL 111     Historical Geology     (4)

Recommended background: GEOL 101 or high school earth science. General survey of the basic principles of historical geology, focusing on the sequence of events and geologic forces influencing the formation of the earth and the evolution of life forms. Topics include plate tectonics, sedimentation, stratigraphy, evolution, and paleontology. Laboratory exercises and field trips focus on regional and local strata, stratigraphy, geologic maps, fossil identification and collection. Three class hours and one three-hour lab or field trip weekly.

GEOL 130     Renewable and Alternative Energy Systems     (3)

Prerequisite: GEOL 101 or high school Earth Science and MATH 099 or equivalent. Provides an overview of alternative energy sources and their ability to meet energy needs. The fundamental concepts of solar, wind, geothermal and other sustainable energy sources will be covered. The availability, economics and environmental impact of these alternative sources will be compared. Three class hours weekly.

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Health

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

HLTH 101     Alcoholism and Its Effects     (1)

Lecture/discussion course presents a brief history of the use and abuse of alcohol in society, the effects of alcohol on the body, family, and career. Societal effects of alcohol use as well as treatment and control of alcoholism are discussed with respect to current trends.

HLTH 102     Drugs, Alcohol and Tobacco     (1)

Provides information on the types of substances that lend themselves to abuse through habituation, tolerance or addiction. Discusses effects and consequences of drugs, alcohol and tobacco on physiological and behavioral aspects of one's life. Also includes the problems of drug use from over-the-counter remedies to illegal trafficking.

HLTH 103     Health     (1)

A survey of topics including units in fitness, nutrition, drug, alcohol and tobacco education and responsible sexuality. Intended to inform students of health risks and behavior modifications that will achieve optimum wellness in all dimensions of their lives.

HLTH 104     Personal Health     (3)

In-depth course in maintaining lifelong good health examines emotional health, drug education, family health, personal fitness, disease, consumer, and environmental health. Three class hours weekly.

HLTH 105     Wellness and Weight Management     (1)

Techniques for assessing physical fitness and body composition. Develop an individualized program to attain and maintain a healthy weight, and improve fitness by applying principles of physical fitness and weight management.

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History

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

HIST 101     Western Civilization I     (3)

Topical approach to Western civilization addresses political, social, intellectual and economic issues; extends beyond past politics and chronologies to increase understanding of the historical record. Course focuses on European cultures from classical antiquity to 17th century; may extend further for in-depth historical treatment. Topics serve as case studies from which to evaluate the present. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 102     Western Civilization II     (3)

Surveys major developments in European history from the 17th century to the present. Some topics may extend further for in-depth perspective. Focuses on the behavior of the many as well as the notable few. Topics serve as case studies from which to evaluate the present. Non-European peoples are of concern only as they and their histories impinge on the development of European culture. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 103     Pre-History and Early American History     (3)

No prerequisite. A survey of the basic narrative of the growth and development of America from native pre-history through the early Republic. The course will offer a general examination of Native America culturally, socially and politically. European and African influences on American history (from exploration to colonization) will be considered. The early years of the United States (from the American Revolution to the cultural, social, religious, and political development of the Republic) with sensitivity to American unity and diversity will be examined. The emerging international role of the colonies/states will be considered. While the major focus of the course is on pre-nineteenth century history, the course will extend into the 19th century in order to provide insight into results of themes examined in the course of the study (historical continuity). Three class hours weekly.

HIST 104     19th Century American History     (3)

No prerequisite. A survey of the basic narrative of the growth and development of the America in the 19th century from Jeffersonian America through U.S. Imperialism. Economic, political, religious and social developments (with sensitivity to American unity and diversity) will be central to the 19th century narrative. The course will also include military history (including the War of 1812, Mexican American War, the Civil War, and the Spanish American War). The course will also examine the developing relationship between the United States and the international community. While the major focus of the course is on nineteenth century history, the course will extend into the 18th century in order to provide insight into root of themes examined in the course of the study (historical continuity). Three class hours weekly.

HIST 105     America in the 20th and 21st Centuries     (3)

No prerequisite. A survey of the basic narrative of the growth and development of modern America. With sensitivity to issues of unity and diversity, the course will examine the cultural, social, economic, and political developments of America in the 20th and 21st centuries. Special emphasis will be placed on the expanded role America has played on the international stage. While the major focus of the course is on the 20th and 21st centuries century history, the course will extend into the 19th century in order to provide insight into the root of themes examined in the course of the study (historical continuity). Three class hours weekly.

HIST 111     World Civilizations I     (3)

Survey of cultural interactions between civilizations; inquiry into ideas, events, and people as forces for contact, change, and continuity in human issues. Exploring China, India, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas, ideas may include imperialist expansion, industrial transformation, revolts, wars, historiography of the other, slavery and race, religion and society, economy and ecology, decolonization, nationalism, globalism. Emphasizes relationships of events and global interaction of movements and ideas. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 112     World Civilizations II     (3)

Builds on HIST 111 to explore different issues but common challenges in the past. Changes over time, experienced differently in various regions, result in a global network. How people adapt and evolve provides a basis for comparing times, places, communities, and experiences. Focus is 18th century to present; topics may extend further. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 210     American Military History     (3)

Traces the development of American military thought as well as evolution of military technology and weaponry, focusing on wars fought from the Revolution to the Vietnam conflict. Discussion of the current status of military technology and the future of warfare. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

HIST 215     World War II     (3)

This course examines the political relationships and the military conflicts among nations in the period 1910-1945. The causes and conduct of World War I and the development of nationalistic rivalries preceding 1939 are included in introductory material, and the course concludes with a description of the establishment of the post war system of international alliances. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 217     African American History     (3)

This course is an overview of African American history emphasizing the challenges and the contributions of African American individuals and communities. This course investigates the intellectual, social, economic, and political history of African Americans in the United States. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

HIST 222     The History of New York State     (3)

Prerequisite: readiness for or completion of ENGL 101 or instructor's permission. Recommended background: HIST 201 or 202. A survey of the history of New York from pre-colonial times to the present. Topics include the Native New Yorkers (pre-colonial, colonial, and New York State), Colonial New Netherlands and New York, New York in the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, the Erie Canal, New York's reforms (abolition, women's rights, religious, etc.), New York in the Civil War, immigration and migration, and the emergence of New York State in the modern world. Three hours of class per week.

HIST 224     Women in American History     (3)

Prerequisite: readiness for or completion of ENGL 101 or instructor's permission. Recommended background: HIST 201 or 202. A study of the historical experience of women in America from the colonial period through modern times. Topics include the examination of women and work, education, legal and political status, religious movements, and social organizations, with attention to issues of age, class, race, power, sexuality, and regionalization as significant variables in women's experience. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 226     Civil War and Reconstruction     (3)

Prerequisite: Readiness for or completion of ENGL 101 or instructor's permission. Recommended background: HIST 201. This course covers the social, economic, and political causes of the Civil War, an in-depth view of its military execution, a geographic study of the war, some of the political and military figures involved, and the Reconstruction of the parts of the United States affected by the war following its conclusion. In order to enhance the students' ability to reason historically, the course will include a variety of political and cultural perspectives and a substantial amount of readings from primary historical resources. Three class hours weekly.

HIST 239     Selected Topics     (3)

This course is devoted to a particular historical event or personage, a particular theme or related themes in history, or the history of a particular area of the world. Note: This course may be used as a social sciences or liberal arts elective, but cannot be taken in lieu of a history requirement without permission of the division chair. Three class hours weekly.

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Honors

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

HON 201-202     Honors Seminar     (3 / semester)

Discussion-oriented class gives students the opportunity to think across disciplinary lines and engage in discussion and writing about significant questions in the field of expertise of the instructor. Since the seminar is defined by method and structure rather than by content, actual content can vary. The course is an opportunity for close faculty/student mentoring. Open to sophomore Honors Study students; others with instructor's permission. Three class hours weekly.

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Humanities

HE 239     Special Topics in the Disciplines     (3)

Presents a topic or theme developed by faculty in different disciplines. Students approach the topic using various tools, methods, and skills from more than one disciplinary perspective. Course fosters appreciation of varying and often differing approaches to the same issue. Students enlarge their own perspectives; learn to think in more creative, original, and unconventional ways; practice synthesizing and integrating widely varying materials; and become more sensitive to disciplinary, political, and other biases. Prerequisites to be determined by individual instructors and divisions. Offered upon indication of need.

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Interdisciplinary Studies

INT 239     Interdisciplinary Study in Native American Culture and Education     (3)

This is an Interdisciplinary study course which meets the SUNY Gen Ed guidelines for Other World Civilizations. The course includes a 10-week on-line component and culminates in a week-long, on-site service learning experience at the Seminole Tribe of Florida school in Big Cypress, Florida. Students will explore past and present perspectives of the Seminole culture to facilitate intercultural exploration and understanding. Service learning opportunities include but are not limited to in-class tutoring of children (pre-K through 8th grade), implementation of a week-long art program, and special programming for the library, computer lab, reading rooms, and physical education classes. May be used as a Liberal Arts or free elective or to satisfy Honors study requirements. Fall only with one week travel during January Intersession.

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Italian

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

ITAL 111-112     Italian Conversation Level I-II     (3 / semester)

For students who wish to learn, speak and understand Italian, but who are not primarily interested in reading or writing the language. Emphasis on correct pronunciation, idiomatic expressions, basic vocabulary and minimal grammar and structure necessary for speaking. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

ITAL 165     Italian Language, Art and Culture     (3)

Two-week study/travel course in Italy. Offers a unique opportunity to explore Italian life and culture, past and present. Lectures in English on various aspects of Italian culture, art-walks covering Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque art and architecture, visits to noted museums and churches, and Italian conversation meetings. Cities visited are Rome, Florence, Venice, Assisi, Pompei, Amalfi Coast and Sorrento. No knowledge of Italian is required. Offered upon indication of need.

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Library

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

LIB 102     Information Research Skills     (1)

Recommended for all students, a hands-on foundation for information literacy and research skills, using traditional library resources and computer applications. Topics include understanding the research process; accessing sources through the online catalog, electronic databases, and the World Wide Web; evaluating sources; using information ethically and legally to fill an information need. Especially appropriate for students beginning college studies; also useful for students who want to be more successful in research projects for other college courses. Class meets twice a week for five weeks. Every academic year.

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Mathematics

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

MATH 070     Basic Algebra     (No Credit)

See Math Flowchart, page 127. Provides the basic mathematical skills necessary to enter MATH 099. Topics include operations of whole numbers and signed numbers, fractions and decimals, as well as ratio, proportions, and percents. Introduces equations, geometric applications, the laws of exponents, operations with polynomials, and basic factoring. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 099     Elementary Algebra     (No Credit)

See Math Flowchart, page 127. Topics include the algebra of whole numbers, integers, and rational numbers; binary operations involving polynomials; introduction of the laws of exponents; equation-solving techniques for first-degree equations; solving simultaneous linear equations by graphing, substitution and addition methods; word problems. Assistance is available in the Center for Academic Success. No previous knowledge of algebra is assumed. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 101     Elementary Mathematics with Computer Applications     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent. Set operations, logic, probability, elementary statistics, mathematical systems, systems of numeration, the structure of number systems, and an introduction to geometry. Introduction to computers with elementary programming is studied and applied to some of the listed topics. Use of microcomputers, available in the Center for Academic Success and Microcomputer Lab, is an integral part of the course. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

MATH 102     Intermediate Algebra     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or pass placement test for MATH 099. Assumes knowledge of elementary algebra. Reviews basic algebraic concepts, then progresses to rational exponents; solution of linear, rational, quadratic and radical equations; introduction of the function concept; factoring polynomials, synthetic division, and the algebra of radicals. Includes applications with word problems. Assistance is available in the Center for Academic Success. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 104     College Algebra and Trigonometry     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 102 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Continuation of MATH 102 introduces the basics of trigonometry and reviews basic properties of the complex number system. The concept of function is applied to algebraic, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Emphasis on applications of trigonometry to right and oblique triangles and vectors. Assistance available at Center for Academic Success. A scientific calculator is required. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 106     Pre-Calculus     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Completes the study of algebraic and trigonometric skills necessary for successful study of calculus. Trigonometric functions and identities are applied to analytic geometry. Systems of equations and inequalities are solved using algebraic, graphical and matrix/determinant methods. Theory of equations including remainder, factor and De Moivre's theorem are used to study and help in graphing of equations. Introduces series and sequences (arithmetic and geometric), the binomial theorem, and mathematical induction. Assistance is available in the Center for Academic Success. A scientific calculator is required. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 108     Calculus I     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 106 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Studies functions; properties of limits and continuity; derivatives with applications to related rates, maximum/minimum and curve sketching; the chain rule; differentials; the mean value theorem; Newton's Method; integration with applications to plane areas, volumes of solids of revolution by disk, shell, and cross sections. Differentiation and integration of exponential and logarithmic functions are applied to growth and decay. Four class hours weekly.

MATH 112     Contemporary Mathematics     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Prepares students for an understanding of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, data analysis, and quantitative reasoning. Students will show competence in these skill areas with additional support using the computer software including the resources available on the internet. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 114     Applied Mathematics for Technologists     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 102 or pass placement test for MATH 104. Intended for Mechanical Technology and Electrical Technology students, but open to any student. With emphasis on applications, focuses on various topics of algebra and trigonometry including mathematics misconceptions, linear/quadratic equations and functions, common and natural logarithms, properties of logarithms, trigonometric functions, right angle trigonometry, and the law of sines and cosines. Applications include calculator limitations, proportions, unit analysis, projectile motion, frequency response of electrical systems, vector and component analysis, and coordinate analysis of complex shapes. Assistance is available in the Center for Academic Success. A scientific calculator is required. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 115     Concepts of Elementary Mathematics I     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or pass placement test for MATH 099. An experiential investigation of mathematical concepts currently taught in elementary school such as problem solving, sets and relations, numeration systems, whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and number theory. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the curriculum recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards and learn various ways to communicate comprehension to the elementary student.

MATH 116     Concepts of Elementary Mathematics II     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or pass placement test for MATH 099. An experiential investigation of mathematical concepts currently taught in elementary school, such as probability, statistics, geometry, and the metric system. Students develop a comprehensive understanding of the curriculum recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards, and learn various ways to communicate their comprehension to the elementary student.

MATH 201     Calculus II     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 108 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Continuation of Calculus I. Topics include applications of integration in arc length and surface area, work, fluid pressure and fluid force, moments and centroids, integration techniques, L'Hopital's Rule and improper integrals. Also covers sequences, infinite series, Taylor Series, interval of convergence, conic sections, parametric equations, polar equations and their graphs. Four class hours weekly.

MATH 202     Calculus III     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 201 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Multivariable calculus including vectors in planes and space; lines, planes and surfaces in space; rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; vector-valued functions, motion, arc length and curvature; functions of several variables, partial derivatives, chain rules, directional derivatives and gradients, tangent planes; Lagrange multipliers. Also multiple integration applied to volume center of mass and surface area; vector analysis including vector fields, line integrals, Green's Theorem, parametric surfaces, surface integrals, divergence, curl and Stokes' Theorem. Four class hours weekly.

MATH 203     Linear Algebra     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 106 or equivalent. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Introduces linear algebra with emphasis on interpretation and the development of computational techniques. Topics include systems of equations; matrices are utilized for the interpretation of vector spaces, subspaces, independence bases, dimension, inner product, outerproduct, orthogonal and orthonormal sets. Also the transformation of matrices, matrix operations, inverses, conditions for invertibility, determinants and their properties. The characteristics equation and its eigenvalue are used for problem solving and the development of linear transformations. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 204     Differential Equations and Series     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 201. (See Math Flowchart, page 127.) Techniques for solving differential equations of first and higher order; focus on linear differential equations. Methods include separation of variables, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, D-operators, Laplace transforms and infinite series. Applications include formulation, solution and interpretation of initial and boundary value problems in physics, electricity and engineering. Four class hours weekly.

MATH 210     Math / Data Structures     (3)

Prerequisite: C.S. 222. Introduces the student to most commonly used data structures and their implementation. Algorithms and operations show the use of major data structures in computer science. Includes stacks, symbol tables, queues, sets, search trees, strings and graphs. Study provides a basis for developing new algorithms. Three class hours weekly.

MATH 212     Discrete Mathematics     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 106 or equivalent. Introduction includes propositional and predicate logic, sets, functions, matrix algebra, number theory, algorithms, valid arguments, direct and indirect proofs, proof by contradiction, mathematical induction, permutations, combinations and other counting techniques, and discrete probability.

MATH 214     Statistics     (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 104 and higher, or MATH 102 with a minimum final grade of C+. Topics range from data collection, descriptive statistics and linear regression models to inferential statistics. Includes probability, counting principles, and binomial probability distribution. Normal probability distribution and student's t-distribution are discussed in single and two-populations applications. Statistical inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing) in sociology, psychology, and business/industry are stressed. Additional topics may include Chi-square goodness of fit test, tests for independence, and testing the significance of the linear regression model. Three class hours weekly.

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Music

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

MUSI 100     College Chorus     (1)

Open to all students. Provides an opportunity for students to enjoy and develop their singing voices. Activities include concerts for the College and community. Three lab hours weekly. May be repeated for a maximum of four credit hours.

MUSI 101     Music Appreciation     (3)

Studies the art of music listening including the basic elements of music, a variety of musical styles and performing media. Recordings and audio visual materials are supplemented with live music. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 102     Jazz     (3)

History and appreciation of jazz for all musical experience levels. Includes discrimination between jazz and related styles; other listening skills include analysis of aspects of form, rhythm, harmony and melody. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 104     Music Essentials     (3)

Presents music fundamentals to students and prospective teachers in pre-K, elementary, special, or physical education programs. Study at the piano keyboard introduces students to reading and writing music notation. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 105     Music Theory     (3)

This course is designed for all students interested in the study of music theory concepts. Students will develop skills in music theory and analysis, music composition, arranging and aural cognition. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 111     Rock     (3)

History and appreciation of rock music for students of all musical experience levels. Topics include rock artists, form, rhythm, harmony and melody; also discriminating between rock and related styles. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 112     Music in Performance     (3)

Two-week course in music appreciation through live performances utilizes a trip to New York City. Detailed study and analysis of works precedes concert attendance. Concerts may include a Broadway musical, choral music, an opera or ballet, the symphony and/or a jazz performance. Offered upon indication of need.

MUSI 115     Jazz Ensemble     (3)

Course explores the repertoire for the jazz ensemble which includes: swing, bebop, hard bop, cool, avant-garde, and fusion jazz styles. The jazz ensemble is for any level of improviser, however an audition is required for placement.

MUSI 116     Small Group Ensemble     (1)

This is a performance-oriented course dealing with all aspects of jazz/commercial small group performance. Students will rehearse three time weekly and have the opportunity to perform on- and off-campus throughout the semester.

MUSI 121     World Music     (3)

Introduction to World Music will explore the musical traditions of selective African, Asian, Caribbean, Eastern European and Latin American cultures. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 140     A Capella Ensemble     (1)

Offers students the opportunity to rehearse and perform vocal music without accompaniment. Activities include performances on and off campus. One lab hour weekly.

MUSI 141     Vocal Jazz Ensemble     (1)

Offers students the opportunity to rehearse and perform music from the jazz repertoire. Activities include performances on and off campus. One lab hour weekly.

MUSI 152     Class Voice     (2)

Designed for students of any singing ability who desire to improve their singing voice. Students learn how to produce a good singing tone and sing effectively. Three lab hours weekly.

MUSI 154     Piano I     (3)

For beginning piano players. Students proceed at their individual pace learning basic theoretical concepts as applied to the keyboard. Students learn how to play piano melodies and perform written works. Correct piano technique is taught as well as proper phrasing and expressiveness in playing. Three class hours and one lab hour weekly.

MUSI 156     Piano II     (3)

Recommended background: MUSI 104, 154, private piano study or equivalent. Students move at an individual pace and build on previous playing skills. Solutions for technical problems are given. Three class hours and one lab hour weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

MUSI 158     Guitar     (3)

Students of any playing level may enroll in this guitar course. Beginning students learn at their own pace to read music, chord notation, and to play chords, scales and fingering. Three class hours and one lab hour weekly.

MUSI 170     Music Preparation for Audio Professionals     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Addresses the musical needs of both aspiring audio professionals and general students. Students have the opportunity to become comfortable with musical as well as technical language. Three class hours weekly.

MUSI 200     Applied Music Lessons     (2)

Prerequisite: Department audition required. This course enables students to study privately with an instructor with the same instrumental or vocal specialization, depending on availability of faculty.

MUSI 205     Music Composition     (3)

Prerequisites: MUSI 105, MUSI 154. In this course, intermediate concepts and materials of music composition are covered. The student will have assigned projects in motive and phrase development, periodic construction, phrase shape, and part writing. The student will complete short pieces for keyboard and small instrumental/vocal combinations.

MUSI 210     Special Topics in Music     (3)

Course is devoted to a specific topic or area of expertise in music. Students will have an opportunity to experience an area of music study not fully covered in other courses.

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Nursing

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

NURS 100     Nursing Success Strategies     (1)

Concurrent enrollment: NURS 101. Provides matriculated nursing students with skills to develop and implement a successful plan of study in the nursing curriculum. Emphasis is placed on awareness of learning style, goal setting, time management, student nurse stress management, critical thinking skills, study techniques, NCLEX (National Council Licensure Exam) test-taking techniques and use of college academic resources. This course focuses on the application of practical strategies to enhance the student's ability to survive and thrive within the academic rigors of a nursing program. One class hour weekly for fifteen weeks.

NURS 101     Fundamentals of Patient Care     (8)

Concurrent enrollment in or completion of BIOL 203. Adult, child, and infant CPR certification required prior to clinical. This course provides the foundation upon which all nursing courses are built. The student will learn the fundamental principles of interpersonal, technical and cognitive skills related to individualized client care of an adult's basic human needs. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. The roles of the nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are introduced. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in subacute and long term care settings. The student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the Nursing Lab. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours weekly.

NURS 102     Nursing in Physical / Mental Health I     (8)

Prerequisite: NURS 101 and BIOL 203. Concurrent enrollment in or completion of BIOL 204, NURS 212. Adult, child and infant CPR certification. This course builds upon the skills, abilities and knowledge developed in Nursing 101. The student will learn interpersonal, technical and cognitive skills related to individualized nursing care of adults with common medical-surgical disorders. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. The roles of nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are further developed. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in acute care settings. The student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the Nursing Lab. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours weekly.

NURS 104     Clinical Enrichment Practicum     (1)

This nursing elective provides 45 hours of clinical enrichment in an acute care hospital setting under the supervision of an expert nursing clinical instructor. The student will build upon previously mastered principles of interpersonal, technical and cognitive skills related to individualized client needs. Clinical learning activities will be provided to further develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered health problems.

NURS 165     Health Care in Great Britain: Historical, Contemporary, and Future Perspectives     (3)

This international study-travel course is offered to health care providers, administrators, and others with an interest in exploring health care issues in Great Britain. The intent is to enrich and broaden the historic and cultural insights of the health care provider through immersion in and study of an international health care system. Participants will meet and exchange ideas with their British peers and compare and contrast variations in past, current, and future trends between the National Health Service and United States health care system. This course will consist of an intensive two week series of tours, lectures, and discussions including well-known London sites associated with past health care issues. Historic and cultural influences will be explored during visits to the Roman baths at Bath, the original Old St. Thomas' Operating Theatre, Stonehenge, the Wellcome Collection, the Nurse's Chapel at Westminster Abbey, the Florence Nightingale Museum, the Gordon Museum, and other sites of interest. Intersession only.

NURS 203     Trends in Nursing     (1)

Concurring Requisite: NURS 216, NURS 217. This course provides students with an overview of contemporary issues and trends and their impact on the nursing profession. The role of the associate degree nurse and the transition from student to member of the profession will be explored. Focuses on the core components within the roles of nurse as manager of care and member within the discipline of nursing. One class hour weekly for fifteen weeks.

NURS 207     Pharmacology     (3)

This course provides essential information to promote the knowledge and skills of safe drug therapy. Basic pharmacologic concepts and application of the nursing process in drug therapy establish the framework of this course. The content is organized into topics by therapeutic drug classifications and their effects on particular body systems. The focus on rationales for nursing actions provides a strong knowledge base and scientific foundation for safe and effective drug therapy in clinical nursing practice. Three class hours weekly for fifteen weeks.

NURS 211     Health Assessment     (3)

Prerequisite: NURS 101. This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to collect a comprehensive health history and perform a physical assessment of the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovCASular, gastrointestinal, neurological, musculoskeletal, lymphatic, and reproductive systems, and the eyes, ears, nose, throat, head and neck regions. Holistic client assessment is emphasized with nutritional and cultural nursing considerations. The lab component will provide practice and evaluation to ensure basic level competency. Two class hours and two lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

NURS 212     Health Assessment I     (1.5)

Prerequisite: NURS 101. This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to collect a comprehensive health history and perform a physical assessment of the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovCASular and gastrointestinal systems. Holistic client assessment is emphasized with nutritional and cultural nursing considerations. Students will independently practice assessment skills and provide documentation for each body system. One and one-half class hours weekly or ninety minute class weekly.

NURS 213     Health Assessment II     (1.5)

Prerequisites: NURS 102, NURS 212. This course will build upon knowledge and skills acquired in Health Assessment I. Comprehensive health history and physical assessment techniques of the neurological, musculoskeletal, lymphatic, reproductive, eyes, ears, nose, throat, head and neck regions and systems will be provided. Holistic client assessment is continued. Students will independently practice assessment skills and provide documentation for each body system. One and one-half class hours weekly or ninety minute class weekly.

NURS 214     Family / Community Nursing I     (4)

Prerequisites: NURS 101, NURS 102, BIOL 203, BIOL 204. Adult, child and infant CPR certification. This course builds upon the skills, abilities and knowledge developed in Nursing 101 and Nursing 102. The student will learn interpersonal, technical, and cognitive skills related to individualized nursing care of gynecological clients and children from birth through adolescence, and clients in the community. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. The roles of nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are further developed with increased complexity of client's needs. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in acute care settings and home care. The student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the Nursing Lab. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours weekly for seven weeks.

NURS 215     Nursing in Physical / Mental Health II     (4)

Prerequisites: NURS 101, NURS 102, BIOL 203, BIOL 204. Adult, child and infant CPR certification. This course builds upon the skills, abilities, and knowledge developed in Nursing 101 and Nursing 102. The student will learn interpersonal, technical, and cognitive skills related to individualized nursing care of adults with common medical-surgical and mental health disorders. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. The roles of nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are further developed with increased complexity of client's needs. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in acute care and mental health settings. The student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the Nursing Lab. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours for seven weeks.

NURS 216     Family / Community Nursing II     (4)

Prerequisites: NURS 101, NURS 102, NURS 214, NURS 215, BIOL 203, BIOL 204. Adult, child and infant CPR certification. This course builds upon the skills, abilities, and knowledge developed in Nursing 101, Nursing 102, Nursing 214 and Nursing 215. The student will learn interpersonal, technical, and cognitive skills related to individualized nursing care of mothers and infants through the maternity cycle, children with complex medical/surgical needs, and high risk antepartum and postpartum clients in the community. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. The roles of nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are further developed with increased autonomy and an emphasis on the development of leadership skills. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in acute care settings, home care and varied community agencies. The student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the Nursing Lab. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours weekly for seven weeks.

NURS 217     Nursing in Physical / Mental Health III     (4)

Prerequisites: NURS 101, NURS 102, NURS 214, NURS 215, BIOL 203, BIOL 204. Adult, child and infant CPR certification. This course builds upon the skills, abilities, and knowledge developed in Nursing 101, 102, 214, and 215. The student will learn interpersonal, technical, and cognitive skills related to individualized nursing care of adults with complex medical-surgical disorders. Learning activities are planned to develop the student's ability to think critically, to reason and form judgments, and to assess, analyze and resolve client-centered problems. Course content includes neurological, endocrine, and hepatic disorders. The roles of nurse as provider of care, manager of care and member of the profession are further developed with increased autonomy. An emphasis on the development of leadership skills is a focus of this course. Clinical experiences are correlated with theory by selection of clients in acute care settings and the clinical preceptorship. Additionally, the student is expected to demonstrate competency of selected nursing skills in the nursing campus laboratory. Four class hours and twelve clinical laboratory hours weekly for seven weeks.

NURS 220     The Art of Nursing: Alternative Therapies     (1)

This course considers the process of providing physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual care to others by focusing on alternative therapies that promote the self-healing capabilities within individuals. Nursing as an art is a caring profession that seeks to assist clients toward favorable health changes. Alternative therapies and their relation to the concept of healing, provide the framework for this course. Offered upon indication of need.

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Philosophy

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

PHIL 101     Logic     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101. Introduces informal and formal logic, emphasizing methods of interpreting and evaluating arguments to develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Three class hours weekly.

PHIL 105     Ethics     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101. Examines alternative theories of the nature of moral value in relation to basic issues concerning rights, justice, freedom and happiness. Course objective is to develop the ability to make well-reasoned judgments about value questions facing the individual and society. Three class hours weekly.

PHIL 201     Introduction to Philosophy     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101. General introduction to philosophy surveys fundamental problems and perspectives representing a range of philosophical fields, periods, and authors. Encourages questioning and reasoning on philosophical issues. Three class hours weekly.

PHIL 203     World Religions     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 101. Studies the beliefs and religious philosophies of major Eastern and Western religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Three class hours weekly.

PHIL 214     Special Topics in Philosophy     (3)

This course focuses on selected issues or positions within the philosophical world. The format includes reading lecture and discussion. Topics are chosen from different areas within Philosophy (such as Epistemology or Ethics) to specific philosophers (such as Plato and Aristotle, the Rationalists vs. The Empiricists, the Existentialists). Topics are chosen to allow an in-depth exploration of the subject matter. Three class hours weekly.

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Physical Education

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

LECTURE COURSES

P.E. 148     Independent Study in Physical Education     (1)

Designed to meet student's unique circumstances.

P.E. 165     Introduction to Physical Education     (1)

For students who wish to transfer into a four-year program in physical education. Explores the diversity of the field, the place of physical education in educational settings, literature and research in the field, and careers. Alternate academic years.

P.E. 170     Sports Management     (3)

Examines the sports industry and introduces sports management careers. Management functions, unique characteristics of sports, the sports manager's roles, skills, attributes, issues, social and ethical responsibilities. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 185     Sports Nutrition     (1)

This course is designed to meet the need of individuals and athletes desiring to increase their physical fitness capacity through nutrition. Topics such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water in exercise will be discussed. Effects of dietary manipulations, body composition, and supplemental aid will also be discussed.

P.E. 199     Physical Education for Children     (2)

This course is recommended for students in Early Childhood or other Education programs. To provide philosophy, principles, activities, teaching strategies, evaluation procedures for children ages three to six through lecture and active participation in class.

P.E. 215     Sports Production     (3)

An introductory course in the theory and practice of television sports production. The course will provide students practical production experience in live sporting events. Students will experience a variety of production roles from producer and director to camera operator, graphics, and audio. Recommended Background: TELC 104. Three credit hours (Two lecture hours/two lab hours).

P.E. 250     Health Sciences Applied to Coaching     (3)

A series of interactive exercises and activities designed to study Health Sciences as they apply to coaching sports. Through these activities, exercises and health applications to coaching topics, participants will gain information, organize it for professional and personal use, and apply it to their particular programs. Health Sciences as applied to coaching will also help define selected principles of biology, anatomy, physiology, kinesiology related to coaching, risk minimization, mixed competition, NYSED selection and classification of athletes, age and maturity of athletes. This course meets the New York State coaching certification requirements for health science and is intended to be 45 hours.

P.E. 260     Basic Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries     (3)

Introduces athletic training students and coaches to the fundamental injuries encountered during sports activities. Etiology, prevention and treatment and evaluation of specific injuries to the head, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle will be stressed. First aid for injuries and emergency procedures will be reviewed. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

P.E. 263     Internship For Athletic Training     (1)

Prerequisite: P.E. 260. Recommended background: anatomy and physiology. Hands-on introduction for athletic training students to basic injuries encountered in sports activities. Etiology, prevention, evaluation, treatment of specific injuries to head, shoulder, hip, knee, and ankle. First aid for injuries and emergency procedures. Three class hours weekly. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus locations.

P.E. 270     Sports Promotions     (3)

Recommended background: P.E. 170. Course reviews strategies for selling sports, including advertising, merchandising, licensing, and sponsorship. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 290     Internship for Sports Management     (3)

Prerequisite: Students must be entering the final semester of the Business Administration A.A.S. (Concentration in Sports Management) degree program. This course will provide an opportunity for qualified students to connect classroom learning with practical work experience. Students will identify their career skills and develop specific learning goals for the work assignment. Students will prepare an employment portfolio to present to employer sponsors and interview for an internship position. The internship position will be sponsored by a local area employer for a minimum of 120 work hours. The internship will enable students to meet their learning goals and develop their skills through relevant work projects. Class meetings per student/instructor/sponsor contract.

PERSONAL DEFENSE COURSES

P.E. 109     Judo     (1)

Designed to provide instruction at all levels of Kodokan Judo. Students will be taught at their own level and pace and may concentrate in one area or pursue several areas of interest. Beginners will learn the basics of Olympic Judo, self-defense and KATA forms. Advanced students will have the opportunity to test their skills and develop or refine new skills. Instruction will be individualized to meet the needs and abilities of each student. Recommended for students considering a career in law enforcement, corrections, military. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 110     Karate     (1)

Basic techniques of Beikokujin Soo Do karate and basic tenets, ethics of the martial arts. Students are taught the fundamental kicks, blocks, strikes, vocabulary, self-defense techniques and katas necessary to attain the rank of gold belt. Additional techniques for advanced students. May be repeated. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 157     Personal Defense     (1)

A planned progression of skills in self-defense situations, including standing, ground fighting, and weapons defense techniques. Psychological strategies, legal responsibilities, and ethical implications will be taught. Three class hours weekly.

FIRST AID AND CPR

P.E. 145     First Aid-Responding to Emergencies     (1)

Meets requirements for Red Cross first aid certification: students recognize, evaluate, and prioritize first aid needs and apply appropriate aid in emergencies.

P.E. 146     CPR Basic Support     (1)

Basic life support in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Students are trained in course "C" basic life support, meeting American Heart Association standards.

P.E. 147     CPR Instructor     (1)

Prerequisite: P.E. 146. Designed to meet American Heart Association standards. Produces highly skilled C.P.R. instructors.

FITNESS ACTIVITIES

P.E. 130     Weight Training     (1)

Use of free weight room. Brief presentation of the history of strength building includes Olympic lifting, power lifting, bodybuilding, strength research, and strength fitness. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 131     Weight Training Practicum     (1)

Review of P.E. 130 and current theories in strength training. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 144     Fitness Theory and Application     (1)

Basic theory of fitness, appraisal of fitness levels and applying knowledge to personal fitness goals.

P.E. 161     Fitness Center I     (1)

Training program designed to meet cardiovcascular requirements and improve strength and flexibility. Following orientation, lecture, assessment, and testing, students attend a specified number of classes on their own. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 162     Fitness Center II     (1)

Prerequisite: P.E. 161. Continues fitness regimen, providing weight control module. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 163     Fitness Center III Practicum*     (1)

Prerequisite: P.E. 162. Pursue fitness goals through aerobic exercise machines including stairmasters, treadmills, aire-dynes, gravitrons and rowers. Sub-maximal aerobic testing available. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 171     Introduction to Dance     (1)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge in various aspects of dance as a performing art. The psychomotor aspect will focus on body alignment, dance technique, flexibility, execution and recollection of short dance combinations. The cognitive aspect will cover dance history and culture. Proper dance attire is required for dance performances.

P.E. 172     Dance Practicum     (1)

This course offers students opportunities to express their own vision and self expression in dance and focus on basic beginner choreography technique, putting movements, traveling steps in combinations to music. The course is committed to helping beginner levels develop confidence, discipline, and terminology in dance education. It will also assist aspiring dancers in preparing themselves for future auditions. Students will learn how to put dance combinations to lyrical, rock, and Broadway music under professional supervision.

TEAM AND INDIVIDUAL SPORTS

P.E. 128     Basketball     (1)

Basic instruction in the skills and fundamentals of basketball. Students learn rules and officiate games within the class setting. Three class hours weekly.

P.E. 129     Basketball Practicum*     (1)

Prerequisite: P.E. 128. Opportunity to improve basketball skills in a competitive setting. Three class hours weekly.

* May not be counted for graduation credit under certain circumstances. See physical education requirements as stipulated for each degree, or contact division chair.

VARSITY SPORTS

P.E. 020     Varsity Cross Country     (1)

Prerequisite: must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to register. Develops specialized training and knowledge in distance running. Special attention given to improving individual peak performance and achieving team recognition.

P.E. 030     Varsity Basketball     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 035     Varsity Golf I     (1)

Prerequisite: Must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Develops specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of golf. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 040     Varsity Soccer     (1)

Prerequisite: must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to register. Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies in soccer. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 045     Varsity Bowling     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of bowling. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Pre-requisite: Must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 050     Varsity Lacrosse     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Prerequisite - must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 055     Varsity Volleyball     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of volleyball. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Pre-requisite: Must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 060     Varsity Basketball II     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies. Special attention to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Prerequisite - must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 065     Varsity Golf II     (1)

Prerequisite: PE 035. Continues to develop specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of golf. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 070     Varsity Soccer II     (1)

Prerequisite: must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to register. Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 075     Varsity Bowling II     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of bowling. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Pre-requisite: Must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 080     Varsity Lacrosse II     (1)

Prerequisite: must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to register. Develops specialized knowledge, skills, and strategies. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

PE 085     Varsity Volleyball II     (1)

Develops specialized knowledge, skills and strategies related to the sport of volleyball. Special attention given to techniques to improve individual peak performance and team competitiveness. Pre-requisite: Must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to enroll in this class. Students must provide their own transportation to practice locations.

P.E. 090     Varsity Cross Country II     (1)

Prerequisite: must meet NJCAA academic standard in order to register. Develops specialized training and knowledge in distance running. Special attention given to improving individual peak performance and achieving team recognition.

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Physics

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

PHYS 101     Technical Physics I     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 099 or equivalent. Introduces the basic principles of physics including scalars and vectors, displacement velocity and acceleration, force, work, energy, momentum, circular and rotational motion. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PHYS 102     Technical Physics II     (4)

Prerequisite: PHYS 101. Continuation of PHYS 101. Covers the principles of electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, light, and an introduction to optics. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PHYS 103     General Physics I     (4)

Recommended background: MATH 104 or MATH 114 (or both concurrently), high school physics. For students with satisfactory experience in physics. Includes kinematics in one and two dimensions, Newton's Laws of motion, free body diagrams, work-energy theorem, conservation of energy and linear momentum, center of mass, centripetal acceleration, translations and rotations of rigid bodies, torque and equilibrium. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

PHYS 104     General Physics II     (4)

Recommended background: MATH 104 or MATH 114 and high school physics. Continuation of PHYS 103. Course content includes Kirchhoff's voltage and current rules; reactance and resonance; electromagnetism, Faraday's Law, standing waves, the Doppler effect, reflection and refraction, mirror and lens ray diagrams, interference, diffraction and polarization. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

PHYS 200     Physics I — Mechanics     (4)

Prerequisite: MATH 108 or equivalent. First in a three-course sequence for engineering students and science or math majors with strong mathematics background. Study of Newton's Laws, work and energy, gravitation of falling bodies, motion in a plane, momentum, rotation of a rigid body, elasticity, periodic motion, hydrostatics, fluids in motions, temperature, heat and energy, heat transfer, change of state and thermodynamic laws. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

PHYS 201     Physics II — Electricity and Magnetism     (4)

Prerequisite: PHYS 200 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 202. A study of the electromagnetic theory using Maxwell's equations, DC and AC circuitry, electrical instruments, measurement, machinery and discharges and an Introduction to Optics. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly.

PHYS 202     Physics III — Modern Physics     (4)

Prerequisite: PHYS 201. Studies electromagnetic wave properties including propagation, reflection, refraction, diffraction polarization and optical instruments. Also, atomic structure, quantum theory, relativity, nuclear models and radioactivity. Three class hours and one three-hour lab weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

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Political Science

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

PSCI 101     Modern Government     (3)

Examines fundamental political concepts, theories and issues. Emphasis on the nature and importance of politics, aspects of the political community, states and nations, and the process and machinery of government. Covers a comparison of governments of several modern nations. Three class hours weekly.

PSCI 102     American Government     (3)

Introduction to the national system of government and politics, this course describes, analyzes and explains the political process in America as it relates to the national government. Study includes the founding process, federalism, the legislative, executive and judicial branches, the operation of parties and elections, the role of law and the courts in rights and liberties, and the process of creating both domestic and foreign policy. The course seeks to give students an understanding of the way behavior of the President, Congressional members, Supreme Court justices and ordinary citizens influences formulation of governmental policies.

PSCI 206     International Relations     (3)

Covers issues pertaining to international peace and security, economic relations, human rights, social and cultural developments, colonialism and international law. These issues are discussed in terms of their development and importance. Also considers actions of the international community in dealing with these problems. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PSCI 207     U.S. Constitution     (3)

Introduces the study of public law. Covers separation and delegation of governmental powers, the federal system, powers of the national government, the judicial function and its limitations, due process and civil liberties. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PSCI 214     Comparative Legal Traditions     (3)

Recommended background: PSCI 102, CJ 111, or CJ 115. Examines the legal and criminal justice systems of different nations and cultures. Focus on the influence of historical, political and social factors on these systems. Compares other societies and the United States in perceived causes of crime and differing approaches to rehabilitation and crime prevention. Cultures representing Europe, Africa, Asia and America, (before 1500 CE), are included. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

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Psychology

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

PSY 101     Introductory Psychology     (3)

Basic orientation to the psychology of human behavior. Studies the aims and methods of psychological investigation and measurement, and biological and social influences on behavior. Also focuses on learning, motivation, emotion, perception, and personality development. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 165     Psychology of Multicultural London     (3)

Prerequisite: Completion of PSY 101 or an Introduction to Psychology course. London is known as the multicultural center of Europe and has the largest non-white population of any European city. This course will not only investigate the broad aspects of psychology, but will also examine how diversity effects the population as a whole. Students will be able to observe the perspectives of different cultural groups and their traditions, language, and customs. Individual and multicultural identities will be also investigated. Several historic sites including the famous Freud museum, London's street markets, and various ethnic neighborhoods will be explored.

PSY 203     Social Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Basic social psychology concepts in contemporary theoretical orientations and related research findings. Covers motivation, personality, attitude formation and change, leadership, group dynamics, roles, social norms, audiences, collective behavior. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PSY 205     Psychology of Personality     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Basic orientation to the psychology of personality. Examines major theories including psychoanalytic, behavior, humanistic, phenomenological and others. Explores certain general issues such as achievement, motivation, psychopathology, sexual adjustment, and personal religious orientation. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

PSY 206     Abnormal Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Scientific view of abnormal behavior and mental illness covers historical overview, unscientific attitudes and legends; emergence of science; movements; classifications; origins of behavior; personality; defensive reactions; psychoneuroses; functional and organic psychosis; addiction; mental deficiency; psychosis of the aged; criminal psychosis; diagnostic procedures and types of therapy. Also examines modern mental hospitals and clinics and discusses professional disciplines. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 207     Industrial Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. An examination of psychological principles, applications and methods relating to problems encountered in business, industry and the professions are discussed in this course. The course topics include: research, ethics, job analysis, legal issues, recruiting and interviewing, references and testing, evaluations, employee motivation, organizational development and communication, leadership and group behavior, teams, conflict and stress management. Alternate academic years.

PSY 210     Psychology of Human Relationships     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. This course will focus on scientific theory and research involving close relationships. Topics include interaction in various types of relationships, physical and psychological attraction, self-disclosure and presentation, balance and equity in relationships, love and attachment, sexuality, communication and conflict. The initiation of a relationship to the time of dissolution is covered. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 211     Death and Dying     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. This course is designed to afford the student an understanding of the psychological and sociological implications of death and dying. Course will examine the impact of death and dying on the individual, families and communities. A thorough examination will be given to defining death as a legal definition, reviewing cultural similarities and societal viewpoints. Students will study death and dying from theoretical as well as applied viewpoints.

PSY 212     Development Psychology - Life Span     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Introduction to the foundations of human development across the life span. Developmental processes and issues characterizing various stages of aging are studied, with attention to the interrelationships of the various stages and intergenerational issues. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 213     Psychology of Sport and Motivation     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Examines sport psychology and motivation, goal-setting, group dynamics. Characteristics of successful athletes, coaching and counseling young athletes, motivational theories, team development, attribution theories, female athletes, building athletes' self-esteem. Focuses on the perspective of coaches and counselors in educational and community settings. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

PSY 214     Selected Topics in Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Studies contemporary issues. A reading and discussion oriented format. Topics include learning and motivation, perception and consciousness, psychology, literature and art, stress, and distress. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 215     Child Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Examines human growth and development from conception to puberty. Students are exposed to a scientific perspective regarding theory and research in the areas of physical, cognitive and psychosocial development. Topics include childbirth, language development, child abuse and parenting styles. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 216     Adolescent Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Examines the growth and behavior of the adolescent and young adult. Studies the effect of physical and environmental changes on the individual, physical, social, emotional, and personal growth and development. Considers individual differences, applications of development and the effect of rapidly changing times. Three class hours weekly.

PSY 217     Introduction to Children with Exceptionalities     (3)

Recommended background: PSY 101. Focusing on working with children in an educational setting, course introduces students to the various exceptionalities, characteristics of children with exceptionalities, federal and state laws, educational implications, and strategies for working effectively with families and other professionals. Off-campus observations may be required with students providing their own transportation.

PSY 220     Psychology of Alcohol, Drug Use and Abuse     (3)

Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: PSY 101. Introductory orientation to the psychology of human behavior related to substance use, abuse, and dependence; aims and methods of psychological investigation; the impact of alcohol and drug use on the individual, family, and community. A review of alcohol, prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, and illegal substances is examined and discussed. 3 class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PSY 221     Assessment, Evaluation and Treatment Planning     (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 220. Orientation to assessment, evaluation, and developing treatment plans for the addicted client as in cases of substance use, abuse, and dependence. It explores the assessment of alcohol and drug use on the individual, family, and community. It studies the aims and methods of treatment utilization specifically designed towards the addicted client. 3 class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

PSY 223     Introduction to Biological Psychology     (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 101. This course is an introduction to the interaction between our biology and everything we do, think, and feel. More specifically, it is a survey of the theories and research pertaining to the scientific study of anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology of behavior and mental processes. t will focus primarily on the structures and functions of the nervous system and explore how the nervous system affects such phenomena as development, sensation & perception, movement, sleeping, eating, sexual behavior, learning & memory, language, thoughts, emotions, and psychiatric disorders. It will also consider the relationship between the body and mind, and how and why brain activity gives rise to your unique conscious experience. Three class hours weekly.

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Sociology

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

SOC 101     Introductory Sociology     (3)

Introduces sociology as a science concerned with relationships, institutions, organizations, and the physical environment. Outlines the major theories as a basis for sociological perspectives on social issues. Covers the origins of sociology as a science, diverse patterns of social organization from a global perspective, the nature and substance of cultural systems and social institutions, and sociological perspectives in analyzing trends in human society. Three class hours weekly.

SOC 102     Contemporary Social Issues     (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 101. An in-depth examination of selected social problems, their nature, causes, extent and their effect upon society. Includes theoretical explanations, significant research studies and evaluations of various techniques of control. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

SOC 104     Marriage and the Family     (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 101. Presents a sociological analysis of the family and its forms and functions in a variety of cultural settings. It provides students with a sociological framework for viewing one of the major social institutions of society in a global context - its origins, structure, functions, and the many challenges it faces in the 21st century. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

SOC 105     Deviant Behavior     (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 101. Sociological approach to the nature and substance of deviant behavior. Examines the body of sociological theory dealing with the causes, distribution, and societal reaction to deviant behavior. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

SOC 110     Race and Ethnicity     (3)

Prerequisite: One of the following courses: SOC 101, ANTH 101, HIST 101, 102, 201, or 202. Provides an overview of the social and ethnic diversity of the United States. Delves into the cultures of various racial and ethnic American minorities and deals with theories of prejudice, discrimination and inter-group relations. Discusses techniques for eliminating these problems. Three class hours weekly.

SOC 120     Sociology of Sport and Leisure     (3)

Recommended background: SOC 101. The study of sport and leisure in society is concerned with how sport influences, and in turn, is influenced by, institutions (education, politics, religion, science, economics, mass media). Sport has been described as a microcosm of our society values-competition, materialism, bureaucracy, power (Coakley, 1986; Eitzen and Sage, 1982). The pervasiveness of sport as an institution is the academic focus of the course. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

SOC 203     Selected Topics in Substance Abuse     (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or PSY 101. Studies contemporary issues and problems through readings, discussion, role-playing, experiential work. Topics cover addictive/compulsive behaviors, medical and religious models of addiction; learning theory and addiction; addiction to alcohol, legal and illegal drugs, love, sex, food, cigarettes, coffee, shopping, soap operas, gambling; workaholic syndrome; cleaning compulsion; hypochondria; weight problems including bulimia and anorexia; family patterns in addiction; children of addictive/maladjusted families; other addictions/compulsive behaviors as viewed in public and therapy. Three class hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

SOC 255     The Impact and Implications of Social Media & Networking on a Global Society     (3)

This course will introduce the theory of social networking, the study and analysis of diverse social networks, as well as cover the impact of social networks on individuals and on the local and global environment. Course will incorporate blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Second Life, Word Press, Meetup.com and other associated platforms. The social implications that will emerge as society continues to move forward with these technologies will range from the most positive to the challenging. The course will cover these implications. Cross-listed as TELC 255.

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Spanish

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

SPAN 101-102, 103-104

Elementary and intermediate foreign languages begin in the fall only and continue as a year sequence. Students who need a full year should be aware of this. When in doubt about placement, students are urged to seek advice of foreign language faculty or the Humanities Division chair.

SPAN 101-102     Elementary Spanish I-II     (4 / semester)

Introduces fundamentals of Spanish grammar and develops all four skills of communication: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Videos and music help familiarize students with cultural aspects of Hispanic society. Focus on classroom audiolingual practice, supplemented by laboratory work. Recommended for beginning students to meet a foreign language requirement for degree or career. (Native Spanish speakers should not enroll. Students who have had high school Spanish through Regents level may not take SPAN 101-102.) Three class hours weekly/required laboratory. SPAN 101 is the prerequisite for SPAN 102.

SPAN 103-104     Intermediate Spanish I-II     (3 / semester)

Improves understanding, speaking, reading, and writing through review and further study of grammar, readings, and video material on Hispanic civilization, people, and culture. Recommended for students with a year of college Spanish, high school Regents Spanish, or two strong years of high school Spanish. Three class hours weekly. SPAN 103 is the prerequisite for SPAN 104.

SPAN 111-112     Spanish Conversation I-II     (3 / semester)

Level I: no prerequisite. Level II presupposes basic knowledge of Spanish Develops proficiency in speaking and understanding basic Spanish. Videocassettes and slides are used to familiarize students with everyday life in the Hispanic world. Practice with tapes is encouraged. No previous knowledge of Spanish is required for SPAN 111. Three class hours weekly.

SPAN 121     Spanish for Law Enforcement Professionals     (3)

Thorough verbal and written practice of Spanish vocabulary pertaining to the Criminal Justice field. Vocabulary pertains to basic information, arrest, booking, DUI, Vehicle Search, Miranda Rights, etc. Cultural issues as they pertain to certain field situations are discussed. Three class hours weekly.

SPAN 131     Spanish for Healthcare Professionals     (3)

Extensive verbal and written practice of Spanish vocabulary pertaining to the Health Care Field. Spanish will be practiced through the use of visual aids, textbook exercises, as well as verbal and written conversations with attention to cultural issues as they pertain to the health care field. Three class hours weekly.

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Student Development

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

S.D. 101     Career and Life Planning     (3)

Provides a systematic method for making career and life style decisions. Presents a structured method for practicing effective decision-making skills, clarifying one's values and learning job-hunting techniques. Examines other topics that influence life and career choices such as goal setting, stress management and communication styles. Individuals develop personal strategies for short- and long-term educational and career planning. Three class hours weekly.

S.D. 102     College Success     (1)

Extended orientation to college, recommended for the first freshman semester. Addresses academic success through topics such as getting organized, reading for learning, test-taking skills, faculty expectations, careers and choosing a major, library research, college services, extracurricular activities, personal growth. Two class hours weekly.

S.D. 201     Introduction to Civic Engagement     (3)

As the introductory course for the Civic Engagement, this course will involve students in field experiences in community agencies and help them reflect on the meanings of community, service and leadership as they work with agencies. Recognizing civic responsibilities and the value of volunteerism as related to community development, students will examine and explore leadership theory and techniques as demonstrated by community members. Students must provide their own transportation to off-campus sites.

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Telecommunications

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

TELC 101     Introduction to Mass Media     (3)

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or concurrent enrollment. Introduces the practices and business aspects of American mass media industries. Explores the history, structure, organization, function and effects of mass media. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 102     Introduction to Telecommunications     (3)

Introduces the practices and business aspects of American telecommunications industries. Explores the history, structure, organization, and function of telecommunications. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 103     Introduction to the Moving Image     (3)

Covers the development and employment of television and film techniques. Emphasis on how these techniques are used as a form of artistic expression and create meaning. Classic films, from the silent period to the present day, and television programs are screened. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 104     Audio / Video Production Techniques I     (3)

Focuses on basic audio and video production techniques. Students attend two weekly lectures dealing with how telecommunications equipment works, with emphasis on the proper operations of video and audio devices. One two-hour lab per week provides the opportunity to practice the techniques explained in lectures. The actual operation of audio and video production equipment begins the first week of class. Material discussed is divided equally between audio and video topics. Two class hours/two lab hours weekly.

TELC 105     Video Editing     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. An introduction to the basic techniques of video editing. The courses includes instruction on capturing and ingesting video from a variety of acquisition formats; basic video editing techniques; video compression; and preparing video for a variety of deliverable formats, using professional video editing programs. Four class hours weekly.

TELC 106     Radio and Television Announcing     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Develops the techniques involved in non-dramatic performance in the broadcast industry. Includes the mechanics of voice, diction and vocal presentation with emphasis on message design and communicating ideas. Students complete a variety of exercises for presentation in the radio and television media. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 114     Lighting     (3)

Lectures and labs teach the theories and methods of lighting for television, film, and theatre production. Basic design as well as instrument selection and application, control systems, electricity, circuiting and color theory will be covered. Required for radio and television majors. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 140     Analysis of Broadcast Equipment Systems     (3)

Recommended background: TELC 104 or ELEC 101. Lecture and laboratory course teaches how various components within radio, television and cable facilities form a working system. Emphasis on proper interface of equipment, equipment compatibility, and changes and substitutions which may be made during equipment failures. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 150     Photography: Digital Imaging and Visual Communications     (3)

Lectures, demonstrations and hands-on activities explore the theory and applications of film-based and electronic imaging. Students learn how to work with captured images, process and manipulate digital images, and create picture files that can be sequenced, saved or outputted to electronic imaging or printing devices. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 165     Broadcasting: The British Experience     (3)

Travel-study course offers a comprehensive view of the broadcasting industry in Great Britain. Examines the major differences between the British and American broadcasting systems, as well as the impact of American programming and technology in Britain. Includes visits to broadcast facilities and lectures by professionals in the British broadcasting industry. Intersession only.

TELC 170     Introduction to Interactive Media Techniques I     (3)

Introduction to techniques and processes of content creation in interactive and digital media formats. Covers the use of CDs, DVDs and websites by broadcast, cable, satellite and internet delivery providers. Two classes, two lab hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need

TELC 176     Video Game Design     (3)

This course introduces the student to the development and design of video games. Students will design and develop basic video games. Students will learn to prepare a game plan in developing their games and create game environments such as action games, maze games and multi-player games. Students will learn to use sprites, objects, events and actions and sounds in game development. They will also learn game mechanics, interactivity controls, level design, game variable adjustments, game behaviors, creating computer-based opponents and methods for making games challenging to prospective players. Students will be introduced to software used to create original game resources such as objects, sounds and visual elements. Finally students will be able to post their completed games online to share with others. Three lecture hours weekly.

TELC 178     Digital Animation     (3)

This course introduces the student to 3-D computer generated graphic animation. The students will use animation software to develop skills in animation art and technique. Students will explore software interface and develop skills for working in three dimensions, with mesh modeling and multi-resolution sculpting. Students will learn to use materials, textures, texture mapping and unwrapping techniques. They will learn the basic concepts of animation and animating characters and objects. Instruction will include lighting objects in the 3 dimensional workspace. Finally students will learn the procedure for rendering their projects for use in other media and game creation applications. Three lecture hours weekly.

TELC 180     Video Field Production     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. An introductory course in video field production. Students will learn the aesthetics and techniques of single camera on-location video recording and postproduction editing. Includes practice in planning location shoots, operating camcorders, location lighting and audio, and video editing. Students will produce single-camera video projects individually and in groups. Two lecture, two lab hours weekly.

TELC 190     Script Writing for Film & Television     (3)

Introduces the student to the process of writing scripts for film and television. The stages of script development will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on dramatic structure, character development, plot structure and dialogue. Three lecture hours.

TELC 192     Script Analysis and Production     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Introduces the student to the analysis and development of scripts from written form into actual video and film productions. Each student will take an idea for a short narrative film through the stages of concept, script, and finished production and produce a short narrative production. Three lecture hours weekly. Offered upon indication of need.

TELC 195     Advanced Video Editing     (1)

This course provides in-depth experience in the operation of specific video editing software and hardware technologies.

TELC 199     Selected Topics in Telecommunications Technology     (1)

Provides experience in the operation of specific software and hardware technologies in audio, video, telecommunications and related media fields. One class hour weekly for 15 weeks or three class hours weekly for five weeks. Offered upon indication of need.

TELC 201     Media and Society     (3)

This course will examine the relationship between mass media and society. It will provide students with an understanding of the ways mass media and society relate to each other both historically and in an increasingly technologically complex modern world. The concepts of media literacy will be an integral part of the course. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 204     Journalism Practicum     (3)

Extensive experience in the operation of a college newspaper. Students participate in editorial, design, advertising, and circulation activities. Requires a minimum of six hours per week of practical activity and two class hours per week. Also requires research into a specific area of newspaper operations.

TELC 205     Practicum in Radio Operations     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Provides extensive experience in radio operations. Students may participate in on-air operations, public service production, or news gathering and presentation. Requires at least 10 hours per week of practical activity and one 1-1/2 hour class period for each student for 10 weeks. Also requires research into a specific area of radio management, operations or engineering.

TELC 206     Practicum in Radio Operations Management     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 205. Extensive experience including all phases of operations management and decision-making for all activities at the student radio station. Includes FCC legal and technical compliance, selection and training of staff, music format, selection policy, news, station promotion, traffic, and continuity. Requires at least 10 hours per week of practical activity and one 1-1/2 hour class period for 10 weeks, and research into a specific area of radio management. Enrollment limited to student managers of the college's radio station.

TELC 207     Video Production I     (4)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Hands-on equipment operations course builds on knowledge from TELC 104. Lectures cover equipment use and production techniques. TV studio, portable television equipment, and editing facility are used in weekly four-hour labs. Students produce several studio and remote programs which may be cablecast for public viewing. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

TELC 208     Video Production II     (4)

Prerequisite: TELC 207. Combines production knowledge from TELC 104 and 207 with effective communication theory. Lectures emphasize preproduction planning, audience research, and effective script design. Labs add experience and expertise in operations. Students produce studio programs for public view, and small teams work on longer remote productions requiring more sophisticated message design and technical editing. Two class hours and four lab hours weekly.

TELC 210     Special Topics in Telecommunications and Mass Media     (3)

Devoted to a specific topic or area of expertise in audio, video, or media-related field. An opportunity for in-depth experience in an area not fully covered in other classes. Offered upon indication of need.

TELC 212     Broadcast Journalism     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Students will learn the fundamental principles and skills of producing local television newscasts including news judgment and story selection, information gathering, writing and editing copy, working with video and other visuals, preparation of news in various formats including packages, formatting news programs and basic studio production techniques. (two lecture hours, two lab hours).

TELC 215     Sports Production     (3)

An introductory course in the theory and practice of television sports production. The course will provide students practical production experience in live sporting events. Students will experience a variety of production roles from producer and director to camera operator, graphics, and audio. Recommended Background: TELC 104. Three credit hours (Two lecture hours/two lab hours).

TELC 220     Advanced Audio Production     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Provides an advanced understanding of audio equipment in the field and in the recording studio. Topical areas include sound reinforcement, recording studio techniques and acoustic analysis. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 221     Audio Editing     (4)

Audio Editing is a lab course that introduces, through practical hands-on experience, the equipment and procedures used in multitrack recording and computer audio programs such as Pro Tools and Adobe Audition. Topics include waveform editing, MIDI editing, playback options, trimming, fades, and automation. Four class hours weekly.

TELC 230     Music / Multi-Track Recording     (4)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Co-requisite: TELC 220. An advanced course in sound recording. Instruction in the methodology of both live and multi-track recording, including acoustics, microphones, recording devices, mixing consoles, loudspeakers, and software. Emphasis on multi-track recording technology including overdubbing, remixing and signal processing. Also studies basic industry practices. Two class hours/four lab hours weekly.

TELC 231     Advanced Recording Techniques     (4)

Prerequisite: TELC 230. An advanced course in multi-track recording technology and recording industry practices. Topics include business aspects of the recording industry; studio operations and maintenance, current practices and anticipated future developments. Covers an in-depth study of over-dubbing, remixing and album production through the production of recorded material. Students plan, develop and produce all aspects of a professional quality recording production. Two class hours/four lab hours weekly.

TELC 240     Audio for Media     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. Designed to develop understanding of the relationship of audio production to various related media including radio, television, video, multimedia and film. Emphasis on sound design and on the creation and recording of radio spots, dialogue, music beds and soundtracks. Students produce several projects under the supervision of the instructor. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 255     The Impact and Implications of Social Media & Networking on a Global Society     (3)

This course will introduce the theory of social networking, the study and analysis of diverse social networks, as well as cover the impact of social networks on individuals and on the local and global environment. This course will incorporate blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Second Life, Word Press, Meetup.com and other associated platforms. The social implications that will emerge as society continues to move forward with these technologies will range from the most positive to the challenging. Three lecture hours.

TELC 260     Broadcast Systems Maintenance     (3)

Recommended background: TELC 140. Provides instruction in the maintenance of radio and television broadcast equipment. Emphasis on procedures common in daily routine preventive maintenance. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 270     RF Transmission Systems     (3)

Recommended background: MATH 104 and ELEC 102. Provides instruction in the operation and maintenance of RF Transmission Systems. Studies radio and TV broadcasting systems, microwave, satellite and cable systems for video, audio, voice and data. Includes visits to various types of transmission facilities. Three class hours weekly.

TELC 275     Internship in Radio and TV     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104 and 207. Intensive individual study and field experience in a telecommunications area of choice to obtain in-service training at a broadcasting facility. Requires a minimum of eight hours weekly at internship site and one weekly class meeting for a progress report. Requires periodic written reports and a journal of on-site activities. May be taken only during the final semester. One class hour weekly.

TELC 280     Video/Film Business Practicum     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. This course introduces students to the practice of managing an independent production company. Students gain experience in program origination, program development, production, legal issues, copyright regulations, marketing and distribution. Participation, under the supervision of faculty and staff, in the college's student production company, C3 Studios, is required.

TELC 282     Music Business Practicum     (3)

Prerequisite: TELC 104. This course introduces students to the practice of managing a record company. Students gain experience in A&R, legal issues, copyright regulations, recording, publishing, marketing and distribution. Participation, under the supervision of faculty and staff, in the college's student record company, Cayuga Records, is required.

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Theatre Arts

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

THA 101     Introduction to Theatre     (3)

In this lecture course, students will explore the components that make up the world of theatre. Class discussions cover far ranging topics such as audience development, acting, directing, designing, history and the business of show business; what it takes to create a show, whether on Broadway or in Auburn, NY. Students will learn that there is more to theatre than what is seen up on the stage. No acting is required for this class. Three class hours weekly.

THA 110     Theatre Practicum     (1)

Prerequisite: THA 113 or 152, or concurrent enrollment. Theatre production is not a subject that can be learned passively. Students in this course will be actively involved in the creation and operation of a live theatre performance. Participation may include, but is not limited to: publicity, acting, directing, scenery construction and painting, costuming, lighting, audio, running crews and stage management. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

THA 113     Introduction to Technical Theatre     (3)

Lecture and hands-on course develops awareness and appreciation as it explores scenic construction and painting, lighting, costuming, make-up, properties, stage management, show run crews and safety practices. Note: Course requires hours outside of class for the preparation of a live theatre piece. Alternate academic years.

THA 152     Basic Acting     (3)

Treating Acting as an avocation rather than a profession, this course introduces some of the physical, mental and vocal techniques used by actors. Students become aware of the image they present. Class participation is required through improvisational exercises, scene work and character studies, with an emphasis on process rather than performance. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

THA 165     Selected Topics in International Theatre: The London Theatre     (3)

Participants spend two weeks in London attending and discussing plays presented by the National Theatre, Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-on-Avon, several West End theatres, and experimental companies of the Fringe. Seminars discuss productions with guests from these companies, including directors, actors, playwrights and designers. Intersession only.

THA 210     Creating a Character     (3)

Prerequisite: THA 152. The course builds on the introductory material learned in Basic Acting. It concentrates on the skills used by modern actors to develop a realistic character portrayal. The techniques of the great acting teachers of the 20th century will be explored. This studio course requires acting in class. Three class hours weekly. Alternate academic years.

THA 238     Special Topics in Theatre     (1)

Course is devoted to a specific topic or area of expertise in Theatre. Students will have an opportunity to experience an area of theatre study not fully covered in other courses. This course may be repeated for credit up to three credits, depending on subject matter.

THA 239     Special Topics in Theatre     (3)

Course is devoted to a specific topic or area of expertise in Theatre. Students will have an opportunity to experience an area of theatre study not fully covered in other courses.

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Wine Studies

Courses are offered every academic year unless otherwise noted.

W.S. 110     Introduction to Wines of the World     (3)

This course is a comprehensive class covering the basics of wine, taste and evaluation of wines, and the most prominent wine regions in the world. Specifically, we will study wines, terroir, and wine laws from the following countries and states: France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Hungary, Greece, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, California, Washington, Oregon, and New York, with emphasis on the Finger Lakes region. Other regions from Europe, the Mediterranean, and the United States may also be evaluated. This class will also study the history of wine and introduce all of the major grape varieties. A tasting lab will be included with each class where we will study wines' appearance, aroma, taste, and texture. Wine descriptors and terminology will be learned and enhanced as the class progresses. The class is limited to students 21 years of age and older.

W.S. 180     Introduction to Viticulture and Enology     (3)

Course covers the fundamentals of viticulture (growing grapes) and enology (making wine). The course is designed as an elective for students completing the A.A.S. degree in Business Administration with Wine Studies Concentration. Students will learn basic grape physiology such as the major varieties, pruning and trellising, soils, climate conditions, and major grape diseases. Basic fermentation techniques such as primary alcohol fermentation involving yeast and secondary malolactic fermentation involving bacteria will also be covered. Simple chemical analysis will include sulfur dioxide, alcohol, acid, and sugar determination. Students will order grapes from a winery, ferment the grapes to wine, and analyze the wine using materials and instruments supplied in their wine kits.

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